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  • Wedding Essentials

    Wedding Gifts and Exchanges

    They say the kitchen is the heart of the home and in our Kitchen & Homeware Departments you’ll find premium cookware, small appliances, crockery, glassware, cutlery, kitchenware, cookbooks, and more. We’ve also got a great range of manchester, bathroom accessories, luggage and giftware.

    Our philosophy is to stock quality brands and products and offer them to our customers at everyday low prices. This means you and your guests can be sure you’re getting the very best value.

    Cheese Wedding Cakes

    Cheese Cakes (cakes made with rounds of cheese) have become extremely popular and the cheese experts in our Tory Street Fresh Market can help you plan a beautiful cake using rounds of quality New Zealand and imported cheese. Cheese cakes can be an alternative to the classic wedding cake or enjoyed after the meal – either way they make a unique feature for your celebration!

    Wine, Beer & Spirits

    For all those toasts on and around your special day! Our Tory Street, Porirua and Masterton Wine, Beer & Spirits Departments stock a wide range from Champagnes to great value wines and beers to suit any budget. Our staff will also be happy to help with recommendations and advise on what quantities you'd need for your special event. You can also ask our staff about our sale or return policy for functions.

    To find out more about any of the above services please visit us in-store.

  • A Taste of Japan

    While sushi may be what initially comes to mind, there is a lot more to Japanese cuisine than this popular dish. Did you know, as of 2019 Tokyo is the  city with the most Michelin star restaurants, with a total of 230 restaurants!

    Traditional Japanese cooking, or washoku, is based on “rules of five,” which emphasizes variety and balance. This is achieved through the use of five colours (black, white, red, yellow, and green), five cooking techniques (raw food, grilling, steaming, boiling, and frying), and five flavours (sweet, spicy, salty, sour, and bitter).

    Along with all your sushi-making essentials, Moore Wilson’s Fresh is home to a great range of Japanese pantry basics so you can bring the wonderful flavours of Japan to life in your own home.

    Kewpie Mayonnnaise: Regarded as the best mayonnaise in the world. Made from egg yolks only rather the whole eggs plus rice vinegar, soy based vegetable oil and a touch of the flavour enhancer MSG.

    Bonito Fish Flakes: Bonito flakes, also known as katsuobushi, are little wisps of dried, fermented bonito, used in Japanese cooking to for their smoky, intensely savoury, slightly fishy flavour. The flavour is somewhere in between anchovies and bacon, but much more delicate than either one.  Bonito flakes, along with kombu, are one of the primary ingredients in dashi - a savoury stock that is
    ubiquitous in Japanese cooking - but they can be thrown in or on any dish that needs a boost in the savoury department.

    Nori Sea Salt: Made by Wellington’s Asian Food Republic, this seasoning can be sprinkled over cooked chicken, pork or seafood as a vibrant garnish and extra flavour. Also great on cooked rice and Asian soups.

    Soba, Ramen and Udon: Although not made in Japan, our range of Japaenese noodles are an essential base for many dishes including soups, salads, stir-fries and ramen broths.

    Yuzu Extract: Yuzu is a sour Japanese citrus fruit, used both for its juice and its aromatic rind. The yuzu has an aroma and flavour that is distinct from any other citrus fruit, somewhat akin to a cross between grapefruit and lime.  This rare fruit is used in authentic Japanese cooking, common in seasoning meat, seafood dishes, sweets and beverages.

    Tamari Soy Sauce: A thicker, less salty, fermented soy sauce that contains less wheat than regular soy sauce (or look out for San-J Organic Tamari for a completely gluten-free option). Tamari adds a full, savoury, umami flavour to your dishes. 

    Miso: A traditional Japanese paste made from fermented soy beans. These are numerous types and textures available. Provides an intense almost meaty savoury flavour. As a general rule, the lighter the Miso colour the more mild the flavour. You’ll find a great range of imported miso as well as a New Zealand-made Miso from Nelson’s Urban Hippie. Urban Hippie have also produced a Misomite which can be enjoyed on toast or as part of a dip, dressing, or marinade.

    Nanami Togarashi: Nanami literally means seven flavours’ in Japanese. This tasty spice blend is made up of chilli pepper, orange peel, black and white sesame seeds, Japanese Pepper, Ginger and Seaweed. A NZ Togarashi is also available from Kaituna Farms which includes NZ horopito and kawakawa. Sprinkle or rub on meat, fish and vegetables or add to pasta and rice dishes.

    Rice Wine Vinegar: Made by fermenting the sugars in rice first into alcohol, and then into acid. Compared to white distilled vinegar, rice vinegar is less acidic with a delicate, mild, and somewhat sweet flavour. A pale yellow colour it is used as sushi vinegar and in making pickles.

    Wasabi: This Japanese horseradish tastes very peppery and pungent. Moore Wilson's stocks fresh wasabi, along with the more common paste and powdered form.

    Sencha Japanese Green Tea: The most popular green tea in Japan, favoured for it’s smooth taste and refreshing finish. Available in a convenient box of teabags.

    Matcha: T Leaf T’s Matcha is produced by grinding tea leaves into powder. Produced in Uji-shi Kyoto prefecture Japan, this matcha not only tastes delicious it is said to be high in antioxidants and vitamins.

  • O'Sushi at Moore Wilson's Wellington and Porirua

    Located at both Moore Wilson's Wellington and Porirua, the unique O'Sushi kiosks have been designed by Miramar's Human Dynamo Workshop. Human Dymano were also the creative force behind Moore Wilson's Tory Street Chook Wagon, a replica of the iconic 1947 Citroen H series light truck, and Porirua's nautical Wine, Beer & Spirits Store.

    O'Sushi opened in 2013 in Tory Street and is housed in a bright red replica of an early 1900’s Te Aro villa, a nod to the rich history of the area. At Porirua, a painting of Mana Island provides a stunning façade for the hole-in-the-wall food kiosk, which was added to the store in November 2017.

    O'Sushi is run by Miki Wee, owner of Newtown’s popular O’Sushi. Miki is an experienced sushi maker and uses only the best, freshest ingredients in her sushi, made onsite daily.

    Some O'Sushi favourites include Japanese-Style Sashimi, Maki, Vegetarian Tempura, California Rolls, and Teriyaki Salmon over Rice. Miki also offers pork buns, dumplings, and miso soup.

    O'Sushi at Moore Wilson's Opening Hours

    TORY STREET

    Monday to Saturday: 9am to 4pm
    Sunday: 9.30am to 3.30pm

    PORIRUA

    Monday to Friday: 8.30am to 4.00pm
    Saturday: 9.30am to 2.30pm
    Sunday: Closed

    Closing times subject to availability.

    Other 'Food on the Go' offerings at Moore Wilson's Tory Street include the Chook Wagon and Pop-Up Food Pods.

  • The celebration alternative - cakes made with rounds of cheese!

    Wedding cakes made with whole cheese and sometimes called cheese towers, are suitable for use at birthdays, anniversaries or any other special event or party.

    WHAT IS A CHEESE CELEBRATION CAKE?
    It is not a cheesecake, rather it  consists of several cheese rounds arranged one on top of the  other in much the same way as the tiers of a traditional wedding cake. To make it look like a traditional cake, rounds of cheese with different diameters are used. The stacked rounds of cheese can then be decorated as you like. Fruits and berries are very popular decorations. Ribbons and flowers can also be used. It is simply a matter of deciding on the style of cake your event  requires.

    WHY A CHEESE CELEBRATION CAKE?
    A cheese cake is suitable for anyone who would prefer a savoury cake or who would like to have a cheese course included at a special dinner. Of course you can serve a traditional cheese board if you prefer, but celebration cheese cake is certainly a great centre piece that is also useful and practical.

    HOW MUCH CHEESE?
    A rule of thumb in creating a cake is to allow around 100 grams of cheese per person -  or 10kg of cheese for 100 people. With a little imagination you can easily create the cheese celebration cake yourself.

    HOW TO ASSEMBLE A CHEESE CELEBRATION CAKE
    The first and easiest way to assemble a cheese celebration cake is known as the American style. You simply find a number of cheese rounds of differing diameters and stack them one on top of the other - using the smaller rounds as you near the top. As you can see in our Fromagerie there is a wide range of cheese rounds available of differing sizes. Don’t use too many different sizes -keep it as simple as you can.

    The second style of cheese cake involves using stands and pillars much like a traditional fruit cake. You can use rustic bases cut from clean and polyurethane rounds of native timber.

    WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO DECORATE THE CAKE?
    Foliage, dried fruit, flowers, berries  and fruit all seem to work well. In reality it depends on the style of the celebration. Find someone artistic to decorate it and you can organise it all yourself.

    While we try to maintain good levels of wheels a minimum of 2-4 weeks is recommended for order.

    At Moore Wilson Fresh we happily supply the cheese  and accompaniments but we do not supply finished decorated cakes.

    To select your cheese rounds, ask to talk to our cheese specialists at Moore Wilson Fresh.

     

     

     

     

     

  • G&T Alternatives

    So we are all in love with Gin right now – and following our passion for ‘G’ is an increased interest in ‘T’ – with a vast array of Tonics arriving on our shelves in the last year or so.

    But what if you’re after a long drink with a little less punch than a Gin & Tonic – well you’re in luck! The Spanish and Portuguese (who are both big consumers of G&Ts) have been experimenting for generations…

    P&T
    White Port – yes, it’s a thing – made from white grapes, but otherwise made in the same way as other Ports, fortified part way through the fermentation, so there is always a nice amount of residual sweetness from the grapes. Add Tonic, and you have a long refreshing drink at around half the alcohol of a G&T, enjoyed in the North or Portugal for years, and increasingly in Gin bars all over the world

    How to make a thirst-quenching P&T:
    -    Fill the glass ¾ full with ice
    -    Add 50ml white port (we have Dow’s Fine White Port and Quinta de la Rosa)
    -    Add 100ml good quality tonic (Fever Tree Indian Tonic is a classic, or try Fever Tree Elderflower for a lifted style)
    -    Gently stir to ensure a good mix in the glass
    -    Add a twist of lemon, orange or grapefruit as a garnish

    V&T
    Vermouth has followed the rise of Gin, with the similarities being clear – Gin is a spirit infused with Botanicals (always with Juniper at the fore) – and Vermouth is an aromatised wine – that is, wine infused with Botanicals (traditionally lead by wormwood). There are even a number of craft gin producers who have turned their hand to making vermouth – locally, Reid & Reid from Martinborough have done extremely well with their red Vermouth, and their dry white Vermouth. Dry Vermouth makes a delicious and again, lighter alternative to a G&T, with more herbaceous botanical character than an P&T.

    Here’s a Dry Vermouth and Tonic Recipe from Laura MacFehin’s recent article in the Dom Post:

    “Last summer, some hip young things were proclaiming the death of the G&T in favour of this drink. This is a ridiculous suggestion. The gin and tonic will never die because it is a superlative drink that brooks no rival when you're in the mood for it.

    However, you can tire of even great things and I urge you to give dry vermouth and tonic a go. It is lighter in alcohol and therefore easier on your head, and is one of my favourite summertime drinks.”

    Dry vermouth and tonic:
    60ml dry vermouth
    30ml tonic
    Fill a tumbler with ice, add the dry vermouth and top up with the tonic.

    Have fun, experiment with different vermouths, different tonics, and let us know how you get on!

    Cheers!

  • Beginning a Vegan Diet

    Whether you are looking to start a vegan diet, or start enjoying more plant-based food, you can be sure to find a lot of vegan and dairy substitutes at Moore Wilson's.

    Vegan Dairy Substitutes:

    Replacing dairy products in your recipes is easy. A plethora of plant-based non-dairy milks are available, such as soy, oat, almond and rice. If you need a non-dairy milk to curdle in a baking recipe, go with soy. If you need the most neutral flavour possible, such as when making a sauce, unsweetened almond milk is a good choice. And don’t overlook plant-based cheeses: there are some wonderful options out there, particularly those made from nuts.

    As dairy products usually provide a significant amount of calcium to the diet, it is a good idea to choose a non-dairy milk fortified with calcium, which is advertised on the label and included in the nutritional information panel.

    Commercial Vegan Cheeses:
    Usually made from soy protein and/or coconut oil, with the addition of colours and flavours. Available in many different varieties, such as cheddar and gouda. Uses: Use to make vegan cheese sauces, in sandwiches, and on pizza and pasta dishes.

    Nut Cheeses:
    Nut cheeses are generally soft cheeses made by blending nuts with water, and adding a non-dairy probiotic to ferment the cheese. Uses: Spread on sandwiches and bagels, stir through pasta, and add to cooked dishes such as lasagne.

    Nut Milk:
    Made by blending soaked nuts (such as almonds, hazelnuts or cashews) with water and straining through muslin to remove the pulp. The flavour and nutrition varies depending on the nut used. Uses: Drinking, cooking and baking.

    Oat Milk:
    Made by blending oats and water: it has a slightly sweet and nutty flavour.
    Uses: Drinking, cooking and baking.

    Rice Milk:
    Made by blending brown rice with water: it is a thin milk with a sweet nutty flavour. Uses: Drinking and cooking.

    Soy Milk:
    Made from whole soy beans or soy protein that is blended with water, and usually sweetened with added sugar. It has a slightly sweet and beany flavour. Uses: Drinking, cooking and baking. Curdles when acid is added.

     

    Vegan Baking Substitutes:

    Replace Egg With:
    Chia or Flax Seeds Ground
    1 egg = 1 Tbsp flax meal plus 3 Tbsp warm water.
    Whisk together flax meal and warm water, and let it stand 15 minutes before using.

    Banana
    1 egg = 1 medium, ripe mashed banana.
    Use in chewy recipes, such as cookies.

    Apple Sauce
    1 egg = 4 Tbsp apple sauce.
    Use in quick breads and cakes, for reduced fat baking.

    Replace Egg Whites With:
    Agar Flakes
    1 egg white = 1 Tbsp agar flakes plus 1 Tbsp water.
    Whisk together agar flakes and water, refrigerate for 5 minutes, and use immediately.

    Aquafaba (Chickpea Brine)
    1 egg white = 2 Tbsp Aquafaba.
    Add to baked goods, or whipped to make chocolate mousse, pavlova or meringue.

    Replace Butter With:
    Plant-based Butter
    Use same amount as butter.
    Use the same as butter. Do not attempt to brown in a
    recipe that calls for browned butter.

    Non-hydrogenated Shortening
    115g butter = 6 Tbsp  shortening plus 1 Tbsp water.
    Use sparingly. Provides structure to recipes where butter is creamed with sugar, as well as frosting recipes.

    Coconut Oil
    225g butter = 240ml coconut oil plus 1 Tbsp water.
    Coconut oil is soft-solid at room temperature and firm solid when chilled. Use solid to cream with sugar.

    Grapeseed, Olive Oil
    225g butter = 6 Tbsp oil.
    Use in cake, cookie and quick bread recipes.

     

    Replace Light Cream, Evaporated Milk & Double Cream With:
    Drinking coconut milk, canned coconut milk and full fat coconut milk or cream.
    The same volume.
    Shake cans well to combine before use. If substituting double cream, refrigerate coconut milk or cream overnight . Remove thick, solid ‘cream’ at the top of the can, and use as a substitute.

    Replace Honey With:
    Agave, Nectar, Maple syrup, Rice Malt Syrup.
    The same volume.
    Substitute in any recipe.

    Replace Gelatin With:
    Agar
    The same volume.
    Agar needs to be heated to dissolve properly, and will set in about an hour at room temperature. Use to create firm jelly.

    Find everything you need to start a vegan diet or alternatives suited for plant-based dishes at Moore Wilson's.

    Need more inspiration?
    Check out our new range of vegan cookbooks online:

    Jackfruit & Blue Ginger

     

     

     

     

     

  • Our Artesian Bore

    Fresh artesian water at our Tory Street Site.

    In the early 1900’s Moore Wilson’s Tory Street site was occupied by Thomson Lewis & Co., Wellington’s major soft drink producer of the era. Thomson Lewis Lemonade, Soda Water and their then famous Camroc Dry Ginger Ale were the mixers just about everyone used. In the 1920’s, the owner of the business  Mr. A.M. Lewis became convinced there was artesian water running underneath Tory Street. To test the theory Mr. Lewis employed Bill Brogden a renowned water diviner from the Manawatu.

    Bill Brogden duly arrived at Tory Street and did indeed divine water on the site but was unable to estimate the depth - which he normally could for the relatively shallow bores he divined in the Manawatu. Undeterred Mr. Lewis employed the Richardson Drilling Company (also from the Manawatu and still in business today) to drill a test bore. At normal depth nothing was found but because of his faith in Bill Brogden, Mr. Lewis told them to keep drilling. Eventually at some 497ft they struck water, installed a pipe and Thomson Lewis now had their own continuous supply of pure artesian water.

    The Tory Street water, from an underground river believed to originate in the Wairarapa, was used by Thomson Lewis to produce aerated soft drinks for the next 53 years or until the business was purchased by Coca Cola and the building sold. During that time the water was capable of flowing at 500 gallons an hour and was tasteless and odourless. Continuously monitored by the Health Department the water was always found to be remarkably pure and never needed filtering. The only time it ever discoloured was following the Murchison earthquake of 1929. When Thomson Lewis sold their business the bore was capped but the water is still accessible today inside the Moore Wilson building.

    This story has been captured by renowned Manawatu artist Paul Dibble in the form of a sculpture which you’ll see in the Piazza of our Tory Street store.

    Today the Artesian Bore is free for our customers to enjoy a quick drink or fill up a bottle to take home. We do ask that if you’re filling a bottle you make a donation for the Wellington Free Ambulance. Since we opened the bore in 2009 over $18,000 has been raised for the Wellington Free Ambulance.

  • Middle Eastern Pantry Essentials

    Following are some of the staples of Middle Eastern cuisine that you'll find at Moore Wilson's Fresh:

    Bulgur Wheat A roughly ground wheat grain commonly used in tabbouleh (a grain salad with pomegranate seeds and herbs) and kibbeh (little stuffed croquettes).

    Chickpeas The main ingredient in houmous, chickpeas are also really common in Middle Eastern salads and stews.

    Za’atar This earthy dried herb mix is often served with bread and olive oil before meals, or as a seasoning for meat and fish. Fresh and punchy.

    Sumac Tangy, fresh and packed with citrus flavour, sumac is often used in salad dressings or dips for a bit of added zing!

    Ras-El-Hanout A precious, potent Moroccan blend of up to 30 spices; each merchant has his own unique blend.

    Harissa A Tunisian hot chili pepper paste that is as complex as it is spicy, with hints of garlic and cumin. Spread it on sandwiches, mixes it into yogurt, and drizzle harissa oil over fried olives.

    Cumin Some say this spice “makes everything Middle Eastern”. Pungent, earthy, and unmistakable.

    Turmeric  Fresh turmeric has a spicy bite and deeply orange flesh.

    Pistachios One of the jewels of Middle Eastern cuisine, bright green pistachios are delicious toasted and scattered over salads, or baked in classic desserts such as baklava. 

    Pomegranate Molasses Rich and sticky pomegranate molasses works brilliantly in sweet or savoury dishes. It has a lovely bitterness to it, and pairs well with stronger flavours such as mackerel and fennel.

    Labneh You can strain plain yoghurt to make your own labneh – a soft cheese. It’s delicious spread on toast, or served with an omelette.

    Dates Nature’s candy, dates are delicious with a cup of sweet tea. They’re also brilliant for sweetening spiced milkshakes, or as petit fours.

    Preserved Lemon Luxuriously soft lemons that, even whole, melt in your mouth. They are bright and yellow and satisfyingly salty. Used in many savoury dishes.

    Kataif  Thinly shredded filo dough, and while it doesn't taste like much on its own, it's a great source of crunchiness and texture.

    Tahini Used in dressings, sauces, dips, even baked into flatbreads and cakes, nutty, rich sesame-seed paste is essential to Middle Eastern cuisine. Look for tahini that is smooth and light in colour. The natural oil will rise to the top; stir to incorporate before using.

    Rose and Orange Flower Water These fragrant waters are distilled from the Damascus rose and the Seville orange tree, respectively. An essential ingredient in many Middle Eastern desserts and Turkish Delight.

  • Reducing Food Waste

    New Zealand homes throw away over 120,000 tonnes of food per year, all of which could have been eaten. This is enough food to feed the whole of Dunedin for two years! Wasting this food costs the average household $563 a year.

    There are two main reasons why we throw away food: we don’t eat our leftovers and some food goes bad because it is not stored properly. The foods we waste the most are bread, leftovers, potatoes, apples, chicken and bananas.

    Here are five easy ways to waste less food in your own household:

    1. Use the whole vegetable

    • Make stock with the off cuts and use to flavour soup, stews, and risotto
    • Dice up stems of broccoli, cauliflower, and silverbeet and add to chilli con carne or bolognaise bases
    • Make a crunchy slaw with broccoli, cauliflower, and silverbeet stems and celery leaves.
    • Keep skins on apples, potato, and kumara
    • Preserve excess as pickles, jellies or jams

    2. Plan your menu to use leftovers through the week, for example:

    • Risotto > arancini balls
    • Rice > fried rice
    • Potato/Kumara/Pumpkin > hash
    • Leftover salad/chicken > filo parcels
    • Fish and vege > fish cakes
    • Cooked vege > puree to make soup
    • Casserole > pies
    • Cooked leftovers > frittata

    3. Eat a range of cuts

    • Support producers by eating a range of cuts from premium fillets to slow cook cuts and sausages or smallgoods
    • Make stock or sauce from raw or cooked bones for soups, stews, or sauces.

    4. Storage

    • Make sure you keep the cool chain going to ensure limited spoilage.
    • Have good quality reusable storage containers on hand
    • Check dates regularly and freeze if it is not going to be eaten
    • Invest in a Foodsaver to pack product airtight for fridge, freezer, or pantry
    • Wrap cheese in paper to avoid sweating
    • Crumb, dry, or freeze stale bread

    5. Shop regularly

    • Where practical, Moore Wilson’s Fresh has most produce lines loose, so you can just buy as much as you need, often.
    • Vacuum packed meat has a longer shelf life than repacked products. Having protein fresh in the fridge encourages cooking without having to defrost the day before.

  • Moore Wilson's Centenary Timeline

    On 1st June 2018 Moore Wilson's are be celebrating 100 years in business! Following are some of the key events and highlights from our first 100 years:

    Frederick William Moore

    Frederick William Moore

    6th April 1892: Frederick William Moore, founder of Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd, arrives in Wellington. Frederick was born in West Derby, Liverpool on 26th August 1868. At age 24, in search of new opportunities, Frederick booked a passage to Wellington, New Zealand aboard the R.M.S Arawa.

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    1st June 1918: Frederick Moore officially opens Moore Wilson & Co Ltd. First premises in Wakefield St.

    Wilson Withdraws

    2nd December 1919: J.H. Wilson, an original director and naming partner of Moore Wilson’s,  withdraws from the partnership. According to Frederick’s son Stan, Mr Wilson left as he didn’t see a future for the business but Frederick liked the ‘Moore Wilson’ name so kept it on.  

    Lorne Street

    Lorne Street

    1927: After purchasing land in 1923, a custom built warehouse is opened on Lorne Street, just down the road from Moore Wilson’s current site.

    Second Generation

    Second Generation

    Mid 1930’s: Frederick’s son Stanley Osborne Moore commences full time work with the company.

    Masterton Store

    Masterton Store

    1944: Moore Wilson’s second store opens on Dixon Street, Masterton, on the site of Cameron’s Service Station.

    Lorne St Closes

    March 1956: Due to extreme pressure on store space and handling and an uncooperative City Council, Moore Wilson’s are forced to shut down their Wellington operations.

    Ross Cole Investments

    Ross Cole Investments

    Late 1956: Capital from selling Lorne Street property and plant is used to start up Ross Cole Investments Ltd, specialising in motor vehicle hire purchases. Company offices were on Oriental Bay, with the business running until the early 1980’s.

    Third Generation

    Third Generation

    August 1960: Current Managing Director, Graeme Moore, starts work full time.

    Masterton Travel Centre

    Masterton Travel Centre

    1960: Moore Wilson’s purchase and operate the Masterton Travel Centre. Closed in 1971.

    Porirua Store

    Porirua Store

    1960: Moore Wilson’s re-enters the Wellington region with a new store on Kenepuru Drive. This is the company’s first ‘self service’ cash n’ carry store.

    Miramar Store

    Miramar Store

    1964: A store is opened on Miramar’s Maupuia Peninsula. Moore Wilson’s now has three stores operating.

    Wright Street

    Wright Street

    1969: Miramar store closes and operations are moved to a larger warehouse in Wright Street, Mt Cook.

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    1969: The Moore Wilson’s card is introduced to help provide a more efficient, tailored service for Trade Customers. Previously trade only, the card is also a way around zoning laws, allowing non-trade customers to shop with a wholesaler.

    Porirua Flood

    Porirua Flood

    20th December 1976: The Kenepuru stream bursts its banks causing a massive flash flood at the Porirua store. Some 30 people, including staff and Christmas shoppers, had to be taken to the roof and ferried to safety by officers from the Porirua Fire Brigade. Stock damage was estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

    Bigger & Better

    Bigger & Better

    Early 1977: After being redesigned by Athfield Architects, the Porirua store reopens just months after the devastating flood.

    Upper Hutt

    Upper Hutt

    1978: A fourth Cash & Carry store is opened in Upper Hutt.

    Home on Tory Street

    Home on Tory Street

    12th August 1983: Moore Wilson’s purchase the Thomson, Lewis & Co. Ltd property on the corner of Tory & College Streets. In the early 1900’s Thomson Lewis were Wellington’s major soft drink producer. The site is home to a pure artesian water bore.

    Moving Again

    Moving Again

    10th September 1984: After building at Tory Street is complete, the Wright Street store is closed and Moore Wilson’s move to our current home. Just in time, as  Wellington’s cafe and restaurant scene was taking off.

    Dominion Tavern

    Dominion Tavern

    1986: Originally built in the early 20th century, the Dominion Tavern (adjoining to Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store) was purchased. Moore Wilson’s ran the pub for four years before it was demolished in 1991 to extend the store.

    Wingate Store

    Wingate Store

    1989: Moore Wilson’s Wingate store opens. All of the foodservice products at Upper Hutt were moved to Wingate, leaving Upper Hutt a Variety only store until its closure in 1998.

    Liquor Category Added

    Liquor Category Added

    1991: The Dominion Tavern was demolished and Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store extended towards Lorne Street. On the licensed site of the old Dominion, liquor was now available for sale at Moore Wilson’s.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1991: Julie Moore, current Executive Director, started full time in the role of Liquor Buyer.

    Cuisine Centre

    Cuisine Centre

    1997: The Cuisine Centre opens in Tory Street, providing Wellington’s only cooking demonstration kitchen. Local and international chefs held demonstrations and the room was available for suppliers and hospitality training companies to hire.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1998: Nick Moore commences full time work. Today Nick looks after operations for all four stores and is the Tory Street Store Manager.

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    December 1998: Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market, a concept believed to be a world first, opens on Lorne Street on the site of the old Elim Church. The naysayers said it wouldn’t last, but after just two days the store was so busy that Graeme had to pull the advertising.

    Porirua Fresh

    Porirua Fresh

    1999: The Fresh category is introduced at Moore Wilson’s Porirua.

    An Evening with Jamie

    An Evening with Jamie

    May 2000: Jamie Oliver visits Moore Wilson’s Wellington, with a large crowd filling the entire lower carpark. Jamie, then just 25 years old, entertained with his signature Essex charm, demonstrating recipes at the event MC’d by Wellington food personality Ruth Pretty.

    Masterton Fresh

    Masterton Fresh

    2002: Fresh category introduced at Moore Wilson’s Masterton.

    Restaurant Association Award

    Restaurant Association Award

    2002: Moore Wilson’s Fresh awarded Innovator Award by Restaurant Association of New Zealand.

    Cuisine Award

    Cuisine Award

    2004: Moore Wilson’s Fresh named Supreme Winner of the Cuisine and Matua Valley Wines Awards of Innovation and Excellence.

    Porirua Farmers Market

    Porirua Farmers Market

    July 2006: A weekly market called Moore Wilson’s Farmer’s Fresh begins, running on Saturday mornings in the bulk warehouse across the carpark from the main Porirua store. The market closed in 2010.

    New Fresh Market

    New Fresh Market

    December 2008: After outgrowing the original space, a new larger Fresh Market is opened on the College Street side of Moore Wilson’s Wellington site. Liquor moves from inside Grocery to the standalone building that housed the old Fresh Market.

    Dibble in the Piazza

    Dibble in the Piazza

    April 2009: A sculpture by renowned Manawatu artist Paul Dibble is unveiled in the Tory Street Piazza to tell the story of the artesian bore that runs under the site.

    Fresh Workshops

    Fresh Workshops

    March 2011: Fresh Workshops begin. Workshops ran on Thursday mornings from 2011 to 2015 in a room off Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Fresh and were hosted by guest chefs, bakers, food personalities, and cookbook authors.

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    2012: Graeme & Julie Moore awarded Wellingtonians of the Year in the Business category of The Wellys.

    The Chook Wagon

    The Chook Wagon

    August 2012: The Chook Wagon opens in the carpark above Moore Wilson’s Wellington Fresh Market, recreating the traditional French ‘Poulet Rotisserie’ experience served from a replica of the iconic 1947 Citroen H-van. The Citroen was designed and built by Miramar’s Human Dynamo Workshop.

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    December 2013: O’Sushi opens in a custom built kiosk in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory St.

    Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct

    March 2014: Moore Wilson’s launch first e-commerce website “Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct”. The website featured a small hand-picked range of wines available for delivery nationwide.

    Berry Culture

    Berry Culture

    September 2014: The Berry Culture frozen yoghurt truck parked up in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory Street, serving natural yoghurt with live cultures and a range of premium topping. The Citroen hit the road in March 2016, returning to Christchurch.

    Moore Wilson’s Online

    October 2015: A new website “Moore Wilson’s Online” is launched with an increased range of wine, beers, and spirits as well as products from the Kitchen and Homeware department available to purchase online. Content including recipes, events, supplier profiles and product trends is also added.

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    April 2016: Pop-Up Food Pods are introduced in the Tory Street Piazza with the aim of giving our trade customers and suppliers the chance to showcase their cafes, restaurants, food trucks, and products.

    Building Strengthening

    Building Strengthening

    June 2016: 18 months of building strengthening work by L.T. McGuinness at Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Store are completed. The new buckling-restrained braces had their first test (and passed with flying colours) when the Kaikoura earthquake struck in November.

    Business Hall of Fame

    Business Hall of Fame

    July 2016: Moore Wilson’s inducted into the Wellington Region Business Hall of Fame.

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    July 2017: With the help of Human Dynamo, Porirua’s standalone Wine, Beer & Spirits store underwent a nautical makeover, paying homage to the regions sea-side location.

    Felix Awards

    Felix Awards

    October 2017: Moore Wilson’s accept the award for Outstanding Supplier at the 2017 Felix Awards.

    O’Sushi Porirua

    O’Sushi Porirua

    November 2017: O’Sushi opens at Moore Wilson’s Porirua. The exterior features a stunning painting of Mana Island by Human Dynamo director Sue Dorrington, continuing the nautical theme from the Wine, Beer & Spirits store across the carpark.

    Celebrating 100 Years

    Celebrating 100 Years

    1st June 2018: Moore Wilson’s celebrates 100 years in business.

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    December 2018 : Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market celebrating 20 years.

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    September 2019: Moore Wilson’s wins Hottest Retail Business in Operation over 20 Years at the Gem Retail Hotlist 2019 Awards.

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