Select Your Currency

What's Hot

  • Middle Eastern Pantry Essentials

    Following are some of the staples of Middle Eastern cuisine that you'll find at Moore Wilson's Fresh:

    Bulgur Wheat A roughly ground wheat grain commonly used in tabbouleh (a grain salad with pomegranate seeds and herbs) and kibbeh (little stuffed croquettes).

    Chickpeas The main ingredient in houmous, chickpeas are also really common in Middle Eastern salads and stews.

    Za’atar This earthy dried herb mix is often served with bread and olive oil before meals, or as a seasoning for meat and fish. Fresh and punchy.

    Sumac Tangy, fresh and packed with citrus flavour, sumac is often used in salad dressings or dips for a bit of added zing!

    Ras-El-Hanout A precious, potent Moroccan blend of up to 30 spices; each merchant has his own unique blend.

    Harissa A Tunisian hot chili pepper paste that is as complex as it is spicy, with hints of garlic and cumin. Spread it on sandwiches, mixes it into yogurt, and drizzle harissa oil over fried olives.

    Cumin Some say this spice “makes everything Middle Eastern”. Pungent, earthy, and unmistakable.

    Turmeric  Fresh turmeric has a spicy bite and deeply orange flesh.

    Pistachios One of the jewels of Middle Eastern cuisine, bright green pistachios are delicious toasted and scattered over salads, or baked in classic desserts such as baklava. 

    Pomegranate Molasses Rich and sticky pomegranate molasses works brilliantly in sweet or savoury dishes. It has a lovely bitterness to it, and pairs well with stronger flavours such as mackerel and fennel.

    Labneh You can strain plain yoghurt to make your own labneh – a soft cheese. It’s delicious spread on toast, or served with an omelette.

    Dates Nature’s candy, dates are delicious with a cup of sweet tea. They’re also brilliant for sweetening spiced milkshakes, or as petit fours.

    Preserved Lemon Luxuriously soft lemons that, even whole, melt in your mouth. They are bright and yellow and satisfyingly salty. Used in many savoury dishes.

    Kataif  Thinly shredded filo dough, and while it doesn't taste like much on its own, it's a great source of crunchiness and texture.

    Tahini Used in dressings, sauces, dips, even baked into flatbreads and cakes, nutty, rich sesame-seed paste is essential to Middle Eastern cuisine. Look for tahini that is smooth and light in colour. The natural oil will rise to the top; stir to incorporate before using.

    Rose and Orange Flower Water These fragrant waters are distilled from the Damascus rose and the Seville orange tree, respectively. An essential ingredient in many Middle Eastern desserts and Turkish Delight.

  • Reducing Food Waste

    New Zealand homes throw away over 120,000 tonnes of food per year, all of which could have been eaten. This is enough food to feed the whole of Dunedin for two years! Wasting this food costs the average household $563 a year.

    There are two main reasons why we throw away food: we don’t eat our leftovers and some food goes bad because it is not stored properly. The foods we waste the most are bread, leftovers, potatoes, apples, chicken and bananas.

    Here are five easy ways to waste less food in your own household:

    1. Use the whole vegetable

    • Make stock with the off cuts and use to flavour soup, stews, and risotto
    • Dice up stems of broccoli, cauliflower, and silverbeet and add to chilli con carne or bolognaise bases
    • Make a crunchy slaw with broccoli, cauliflower, and silverbeet stems and celery leaves.
    • Keep skins on apples, potato, and kumara
    • Preserve excess as pickles, jellies or jams

    2. Plan your menu to use leftovers through the week, for example:

    • Risotto > arancini balls
    • Rice > fried rice
    • Potato/Kumara/Pumpkin > hash
    • Leftover salad/chicken > filo parcels
    • Fish and vege > fish cakes
    • Cooked vege > puree to make soup
    • Casserole > pies
    • Cooked leftovers > frittata

    3. Eat a range of cuts

    • Support producers by eating a range of cuts from premium fillets to slow cook cuts and sausages or smallgoods
    • Make stock or sauce from raw or cooked bones for soups, stews, or sauces.

    4. Storage

    • Make sure you keep the cool chain going to ensure limited spoilage.
    • Have good quality reusable storage containers on hand
    • Check dates regularly and freeze if it is not going to be eaten
    • Invest in a Foodsaver to pack product airtight for fridge, freezer, or pantry
    • Wrap cheese in paper to avoid sweating
    • Crumb, dry, or freeze stale bread

    5. Shop regularly

    • Where practical, Moore Wilson’s Fresh has most produce lines loose, so you can just buy as much as you need, often.
    • Vacuum packed meat has a longer shelf life than repacked products. Having protein fresh in the fridge encourages cooking without having to defrost the day before.

  • Moore Wilson's Centenary Timeline

    On 1st June 2018 Moore Wilson's are be celebrating 100 years in business! Following are some of the key events and highlights from our first 100 years:

    Frederick William Moore

    Frederick William Moore

    6th April 1892: Frederick William Moore, founder of Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd, arrives in Wellington. Frederick was born in West Derby, Liverpool on 26th August 1868. At age 24, in search of new opportunities, Frederick booked a passage to Wellington, New Zealand aboard the R.M.S Arawa.

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    1st June 1918: Frederick Moore officially opens Moore Wilson & Co Ltd. First premises in Wakefield St.

    Wilson Withdraws

    2nd December 1919: J.H. Wilson, an original director and naming partner of Moore Wilson’s,  withdraws from the partnership. According to Frederick’s son Stan, Mr Wilson left as he didn’t see a future for the business but Frederick liked the ‘Moore Wilson’ name so kept it on.  

    Lorne Street

    Lorne Street

    1927: After purchasing land in 1923, a custom built warehouse is opened on Lorne Street, just down the road from Moore Wilson’s current site.

    Second Generation

    Second Generation

    Mid 1930’s: Frederick’s son Stanley Osborne Moore commences full time work with the company.

    Masterton Store

    Masterton Store

    1944: Moore Wilson’s second store opens on Dixon Street, Masterton, on the site of Cameron’s Service Station.

    Lorne St Closes

    March 1956: Due to extreme pressure on store space and handling and an uncooperative City Council, Moore Wilson’s are forced to shut down their Wellington operations.

    Ross Cole Investments

    Ross Cole Investments

    Late 1956: Capital from selling Lorne Street property and plant is used to start up Ross Cole Investments Ltd, specialising in motor vehicle hire purchases. Company offices were on Oriental Bay, with the business running until the early 1980’s.

    Third Generation

    Third Generation

    August 1960: Current Managing Director, Graeme Moore, starts work full time.

    Masterton Travel Centre

    Masterton Travel Centre

    1960: Moore Wilson’s purchase and operate the Masterton Travel Centre. Closed in 1971.

    Porirua Store

    Porirua Store

    1960: Moore Wilson’s re-enters the Wellington region with a new store on Kenepuru Drive. This is the company’s first ‘self service’ cash n’ carry store.

    Miramar Store

    Miramar Store

    1964: A store is opened on Miramar’s Maupuia Peninsula. Moore Wilson’s now has three stores operating.

    Wright Street

    Wright Street

    1969: Miramar store closes and operations are moved to a larger warehouse in Wright Street, Mt Cook.

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    1969: The Moore Wilson’s card is introduced to help provide a more efficient, tailored service for Trade Customers. Previously trade only, the card is also a way around zoning laws, allowing non-trade customers to shop with a wholesaler.

    Porirua Flood

    Porirua Flood

    20th December 1976: The Kenepuru stream bursts its banks causing a massive flash flood at the Porirua store. Some 30 people, including staff and Christmas shoppers, had to be taken to the roof and ferried to safety by officers from the Porirua Fire Brigade. Stock damage was estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

    Bigger & Better

    Bigger & Better

    Early 1977: After being redesigned by Athfield Architects, the Porirua store reopens just months after the devastating flood.

    Upper Hutt

    Upper Hutt

    1978: A fourth Cash & Carry store is opened in Upper Hutt.

    Home on Tory Street

    Home on Tory Street

    12th August 1983: Moore Wilson’s purchase the Thomson, Lewis & Co. Ltd property on the corner of Tory & College Streets. In the early 1900’s Thomson Lewis were Wellington’s major soft drink producer. The site is home to a pure artesian water bore.

    Moving Again

    Moving Again

    10th September 1984: After building at Tory Street is complete, the Wright Street store is closed and Moore Wilson’s move to our current home. Just in time, as  Wellington’s cafe and restaurant scene was taking off.

    Dominion Tavern

    Dominion Tavern

    1986: Originally built in the early 20th century, the Dominion Tavern (adjoining to Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store) was purchased. Moore Wilson’s ran the pub for four years before it was demolished in 1991 to extend the store.

    Wingate Store

    Wingate Store

    1989: Moore Wilson’s Wingate store opens. All of the foodservice products at Upper Hutt were moved to Wingate, leaving Upper Hutt a Variety only store until its closure in 1998.

    Liquor Category Added

    Liquor Category Added

    1991: The Dominion Tavern was demolished and Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store extended towards Lorne Street. On the licensed site of the old Dominion, liquor was now available for sale at Moore Wilson’s.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1991: Julie Moore, current Executive Director, started full time in the role of Liquor Buyer.

    Cuisine Centre

    Cuisine Centre

    1997: The Cuisine Centre opens in Tory Street, providing Wellington’s only cooking demonstration kitchen. Local and international chefs held demonstrations and the room was available for suppliers and hospitality training companies to hire.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1998: Nick Moore commences full time work. Today Nick looks after operations for all four stores and is the Tory Street Store Manager.

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    December 1998: Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market, a concept believed to be a world first, opens on Lorne Street on the site of the old Elim Church. The naysayers said it wouldn’t last, but after just two days the store was so busy that Graeme had to pull the advertising.

    Porirua Fresh

    Porirua Fresh

    1999: The Fresh category is introduced at Moore Wilson’s Porirua.

    An Evening with Jamie

    An Evening with Jamie

    May 2000: Jamie Oliver visits Moore Wilson’s Wellington, with a large crowd filling the entire lower carpark. Jamie, then just 25 years old, entertained with his signature Essex charm, demonstrating recipes at the event MC’d by Wellington food personality Ruth Pretty.

    Masterton Fresh

    Masterton Fresh

    2002: Fresh category introduced at Moore Wilson’s Masterton.

    Restaurant Association Award

    Restaurant Association Award

    2002: Moore Wilson’s Fresh awarded Innovator Award by Restaurant Association of New Zealand.

    Cuisine Award

    Cuisine Award

    2004: Moore Wilson’s Fresh named Supreme Winner of the Cuisine and Matua Valley Wines Awards of Innovation and Excellence.

    Porirua Farmers Market

    Porirua Farmers Market

    July 2006: A weekly market called Moore Wilson’s Farmer’s Fresh begins, running on Saturday mornings in the bulk warehouse across the carpark from the main Porirua store. The market closed in 2010.

    New Fresh Market

    New Fresh Market

    December 2008: After outgrowing the original space, a new larger Fresh Market is opened on the College Street side of Moore Wilson’s Wellington site. Liquor moves from inside Grocery to the standalone building that housed the old Fresh Market.

    Dibble in the Piazza

    Dibble in the Piazza

    April 2009: A sculpture by renowned Manawatu artist Paul Dibble is unveiled in the Tory Street Piazza to tell the story of the artesian bore that runs under the site.

    Fresh Workshops

    Fresh Workshops

    March 2011: Fresh Workshops begin. Workshops ran on Thursday mornings from 2011 to 2015 in a room off Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Fresh and were hosted by guest chefs, bakers, food personalities, and cookbook authors.

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    2012: Graeme & Julie Moore awarded Wellingtonians of the Year in the Business category of The Wellys.

    The Chook Wagon

    The Chook Wagon

    August 2012: The Chook Wagon opens in the carpark above Moore Wilson’s Wellington Fresh Market, recreating the traditional French ‘Poulet Rotisserie’ experience served from a replica of the iconic 1947 Citroen H-van. The Citroen was designed and built by Miramar’s Human Dynamo Workshop.

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    December 2013: O’Sushi opens in a custom built kiosk in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory St.

    Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct

    March 2014: Moore Wilson’s launch first e-commerce website “Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct”. The website featured a small hand-picked range of wines available for delivery nationwide.

    Berry Culture

    Berry Culture

    September 2014: The Berry Culture frozen yoghurt truck parked up in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory Street, serving natural yoghurt with live cultures and a range of premium topping. The Citroen hit the road in March 2016, returning to Christchurch.

    Moore Wilson’s Online

    October 2015: A new website “Moore Wilson’s Online” is launched with an increased range of wine, beers, and spirits as well as products from the Kitchen and Homeware department available to purchase online. Content including recipes, events, supplier profiles and product trends is also added.

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    April 2016: Pop-Up Food Pods are introduced in the Tory Street Piazza with the aim of giving our trade customers and suppliers the chance to showcase their cafes, restaurants, food trucks, and products.

    Building Strengthening

    Building Strengthening

    June 2016: 18 months of building strengthening work by L.T. McGuinness at Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Store are completed. The new buckling-restrained braces had their first test (and passed with flying colours) when the Kaikoura earthquake struck in November.

    Business Hall of Fame

    Business Hall of Fame

    July 2016: Moore Wilson’s inducted into the Wellington Region Business Hall of Fame.

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    July 2017: With the help of Human Dynamo, Porirua’s standalone Wine, Beer & Spirits store underwent a nautical makeover, paying homage to the regions sea-side location.

    Felix Awards

    Felix Awards

    October 2017: Moore Wilson’s accept the award for Outstanding Supplier at the 2017 Felix Awards.

    O’Sushi Porirua

    O’Sushi Porirua

    November 2017: O’Sushi opens at Moore Wilson’s Porirua. The exterior features a stunning painting of Mana Island by Human Dynamo director Sue Dorrington, continuing the nautical theme from the Wine, Beer & Spirits store across the carpark.

    Celebrating 100 Years

    Celebrating 100 Years

    1st June 2018: Moore Wilson’s celebrates 100 years in business.

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    December 2018 : Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market celebrating 20 years.

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    September 2019: Moore Wilson’s wins Hottest Retail Business in Operation over 20 Years at the Gem Retail Hotlist 2019 Awards.

  • New Zealand Honey

    Honey has a long history of human consumption. Apparently humans began hunting for honey at least 8000 years ago as evidenced by some ancient cave paintings found in Spain. Honey is also found in the records of ancient Egypt and it is acknowledged that the art of beekeeping has existed in China since time immemorial.

    Honey, of course, is made by bees using nectar from flowers. Honey gets its sweetness from a combination of fructose and glucose. These two sugars don’t need to be broken down by our digestive system so honey is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, giving a quick energy boost to the body.

    The flavour of the honey depends on the plants and flowers where the bees have collected their nectar and this is why New Zealand honey is quite special. New Zealand’s long isolation from the rest of the world and its island biogeography means that the flora and fauna here is extraordinarily unique. About 80% of this flora only occurs in New Zealand and this uniqueness has a remarkable influence on our locally produced honey. One of the most common examples of this unique flora is Manuka, a local evergreen tree. The intensely scented Manuka flowers bloom in summer and bees absolutely love them.

    Today there is even a registered trademark called UMF which means Unique Manuka Factors. It has become a world renowned trademark because Manuka honey is internationally acknowledged as having anti-bacterial properties that remarkably support the body's health and well-being. In particular 15+ Manuka Honey is being increasingly used in the treatment of burns.

    Along with being renowned for its health properties, Manuka honey is a wonderful eating experience. The dark cream to dark brown honey has a distinctive taste profile; slightly bitter, herbaceous, with intense woody and slightly nutty flavour notes.

    In fact New Zealand’s unique flora results in a wide range of different honey flavours and our local honey producers are making the most of this uniqueness. Mono-floral (single flower) honeys are  increasingly popular and honeys available include Beechwood, Pohutakawa, Kamahi, Rata, Tawari, Rewarewa and also honey made from imported field flora such as clover and thyme and various wild flowers (such as bugloss). The diversity of the New Zealand honey range is quite outstanding.

    Honey colour ranges from almost colourless to dark amber brown.  In general, honeys from forest floral sources are darker in colour and richer in flavour while honeys from field floral sources are lighter in colour with a delicate fine flavour. And honey, of course, can be presented in a variety of forms including comb, liquid and creamed.

    NZ Honey brands available from Moore Wilson's Fresh include Arataki (Hawkes Bay), J Bush and Sons (Blenheim), Earthbound (Auckland), J Friend & Co. (Christchurch), Local Flavour (Wellington), and Silverstream (Upper Hutt).

    There are many wide and varied uses for honey including:

    FOOD

    • The most common use of honey is to simply serve it on bread or toast. Increasingly popular is a little honey mixed with your breakfast muesli
    • It is also widely used as sweetener in baking, as an ingredient in glazes, or as a flavourful addition in Asian dishes
    • Use to sweeten your homemade nut milks
    • For something different, try infusing your honey with different flavour combinations like ginger and lime or apple cider and dried figs

    HEALTH

    • Honey is a natural antiseptic so will help to heal wounds, cuts, scraps and burns
    • Combine with the juice of one lemon to sooth sore throats and coughs
    • Combine equal parts honey, vinegar and water and drink to remove parasites

    BEAUTY

    • Use as a moisturizer, simply rub on to dry or patchy skin and let it sit for around 30 minutes before washing off
    • Add a teaspoon to your normal shampoo to help smooth damaged locks
    • Relax and soak your skin in a soothing honey bath – dissolve 2 tablespoons of honey in 1 cup hot water and add to your bath along with a couple of drops of lavender oil
    • Combine 2 teaspoons of milk with 2 tablespoons of honey for a natural face mask. Cover your face and let it sit for 10 minutes before washing off
  • Greek Wines

    The 1980s was not the best time for wine drinkers – for most of us there was not a huge choice, and imported wines especially were often the mass produced and lower-end of the spectrum.

    Some wine regions have struggled to shake off the reputations made for them, but in these more enlightened times, we know there is more to German wines than Piesporter and Black Tower, so much more to Sherry than flagons of Pale Cream, and so so much more to Greek wine than the Retsina you drank from a tap in the wall on your holiday in Corfu!

    Greece is one of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world, with evidence of winemaking dating back 6,500 years, and in Roman times wines from Greece were renowned for their quality.

    Despite the surge in popularity of wine in recent years, modern Greek wines are only just coming to the attention of the world’s wine drinkers, and those who are adventurous enough to give them a try will be rewarded with interesting wines made using varieties you’ve never heard of.

    We’ll be the first to admit we struggle to pronounce some of these names (especially after a glass or two) but don’t let that put you off – we’ve added pronunciation guides for each wine…

    Boutari Moschofilero  (mo-sko-feel-er-oh)

    A strong varietal aroma of flowers and citrus fruit on the nose and palate, with white rose and orange blossom prevailing. A fresh wine, full and balanced, with a long finish. In an effort to literally save the Moschofilero variety from extinction and in recognition of the enormous potential of this strongly aromatic variety, Boutari worked hard to produce their now famous Moschofilero.

    Boutari Agiorgitiko        (ah-jor-yee-tee-koh)

    Deep red, attractive colour and a rich aromatic bouquet, with a balance of red fruit aromas, like plum and the sweet notes of ageing, vanilla and cocoa. Rich, well-structured, balanced, with a velvety aftertaste. Similar in style to Merlot, but with slightly more spice.

    Cambas Mavrodaphnie Of Patras            (mav-roh-daf-nee)

    A remarkably affordable example of this famous sweet red wine from the hilly northwestern region of Achaia. Aromas of raisins, dark chocolate and cinnamon, with a rich textured palate and a long finish. Serve slightly chilled as an aperitif, or at the end of the meal with a decadent dessert.

    Retsina Cambas Karavaki  (ret-see-nah) - ideally in an Essex accent, for that authentic Brits-abroad Greek island holiday vibe…

    Ok ok, so we’ve done a lot of taking-the-mickey out of Retsina – but it is a specialty of Greece, a white wine infused with the sap of the Allepo pine tree. Aromas of linseed oil and lime peel that lead into flavors of apples and roses, with a subtle piney, saline finish. And as with all things, there are better examples. This Karavaki Retsina by Cambas is one of the lighter examples, with bright fruit aromas underpinned with the resinous pine backbone. Try with richer seafood such as octopus or shellfish.

    Eat The Food, Drink The Wine... As with many older wine regions, the best way to appreciate the wines of Greece is with the local cuisine. It makes sense really, as the style of the dishes and the style of the wine have evolved alongside each other over many centuries. Many Greek wines have an element of spice and rich aromatics, which perfectly balance the intensity of Greek foods. So grab some Kalamata olives, some quality feta and dig in!

  • Kombucha

    Kombucha is a fermented beverage of black tea and sugar. It contains a colony of bacteria and yeast that are responsible for initiating the fermentation process once combined with sugar. Kombucha has become popular recently for its probiotic qualities. Its fizzy bite makes it a great alternative to sugar-laden soft drinks.

    A wealth of research can be found online around the benefits of drinking Koumbucha. Possible benefits include improved digestion, prevention of disease through reduced inflammation, mental clarity, and mood stability.

    Kombuchas that are raw and unpasteurised are a living product that must be refrigerated at all times, these varieties are said to have the greatest health benefits.

    Following is a guide to the Kombucha brands available at Moore Wilson’s Fresh:

     

    Daily Organics

    Situated in the quiet rural countryside of Matakana New Zealand, Daily Organics is a unique micro brewery creating traditional wild fermented kombucha. Each small batch is hand blended, individually brewed to a bespoke recipe taking over two months to mature. With no added sweeteners, preservatives, flavourings or additives, Daily Organics Kombucha is 100% Organic Bio Gro Certified and contains no gluten or dairy. Raw and unpasteurised.

    Their Original flavour is a traditional brew using a bold blend of black tea, delivering an uncomplicated full body taste with a subtle hint of peachiness. Winter and Summer brews available when in season.

     

    Happy Belly Ferments

    Our most local Kombucha, Happy Belly produce both Kombucha and Kefir Water in the Wairarapa.

    Happy Belly Kombucha is a raw, natural and active brew, meaning each batch will be slightly different. Unlike Kombucha which is made of tea, Water Kefir is made with  water and sugar which is fermented out, fresh lemon juice and fresh ginger. Typically both contain the bacteria lactobacillus.

     

    Organic Mechanic

    Finely craft-brewed and fermented Organic Mechanic Living Probiotic Kombucha from Parnell, Auckland. Ginger infused for extra digestive anti-inflammatory support.

     

    Kombucha King

    Kombucha King was first company to brew kombucha commercially in New Zealand. They began production in 2009 in Hawke’s Bay and in 2015 became organically certified under AssureQuality. Low in sugar, have no artificial flavours or sweeteners, have no colourings or no preservatives, gluten free and dairy free. Naturally carbonated via the fermentation process. Not pasteurised or heat treated. Flavours available include original, berry and ginger.

     

    Rene’s Kombucha

    René Archner is an internationally well known living foods chef and advocate for raw eating. René’s Kombucha is fermented/cultured for 6-8 days. This, and the use of our selected organic teas, assures a very pleasant flavour. René’s Kombucha is not pasteurised and hence contains the live cultures provided by the SCOBY. Available in red berry, pomegranate and lemon ginger.

     

    Goodbuzz

    Good Buzz has become extremely popular around New Zealand and can be found in cafes, healthfood shops, supermarkets, gyms, even some bars! It takes a little over two weeks to make a bottle of Good Buzz. A symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast is put in a sweetened tea brew and the bacteria feed on the sugars converting them into organic acids, which gives kombucha its iconic tang.

    Every Good Buzz is certified organic by BioGro NZ, fair trade certified by Fairtrade NZ, approved by the Coeliac Society (certified gluten-free) and approved by the Vegetarian Society of NZ. This is a great one to try if you’re new to kombucha with a range of pleasant flavours—feijoa, original, and raspberry lemon.

     

    Due to its live nature, Kombucha is available in store only. Look out for our full range in the fridge at Moore Wilson's Wellington Fresh Market. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    A new destination bottle store, waiting to be explored.

    Our Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits store has undergone an exciting nautical makeover. The regions sea-side setting is celebrated in store with replicas of the iconic Mana Boatsheds, stunning imagery of the inlet, a custom built boat counter, historic photographs, and more!

    The nautical overhaul of the Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits store, located opposite the main store, was carried out by Miramar’s Human Dynamo Workshop. Human Dynamo were also the creative force behind The Chook Wagon and Miki’s Sushi Kiosk at our Tory Street store.

    Moore Wilson’s Wine, Beer & Spirits is home to a top range of quality wines from New Zealand and abroad. NZ craft and imported spirits also feature, as do specialty liqueurs. Craft beer fans will be excited to find a great selection of craft beer along with a regularly changing line-up of fresh craft beer, available by the rigger.

    We hope you will enjoy the experience of visiting our new Wine, Beer & Spirits store as much as we’ve enjoyed creating it.

    More exciting developments are planned for our Porirua store so be sure to keep an eye out next time you visit us!

    Moore Wilson's Porirua is located at 65-69 Kenepuru Drive. Open 7 Days. Click here for store hours.

  • Try Something Different: The Wines of Sicily

    Sitting just at the end of Italy’s boot, Sicily is the largest island in the Mediterranean, and is one of Europe’s oldest viticultural regions. The island has more vineyards, and more indigenous grape varieties than any other region of Italy.

    With its volcanic soils and warm climate, Sicily has long been renowned for its red wines especially. Sicilians have an amazing number of local grape varieties to work with, including the famed Nero d’Avola, Nerelo Mascalese, Frappato, and Nerello Cappuccio, to name but a few, though common international varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah/Shiraz and even Chardonnay are increasingly being planted in Sicily.

    NERO D’AVOLA – SICILY’S ICONIC RED GRAPE

    If this grape isn't on your radar, it should be! Named after the city of Avola in the far South of Sicily, this grape excels in the warm conditions, with the ability to soak up plenty of sunshine and produce powerful fruit-lead wines with added complexity of pepper and spice character. As a result, it is often called Sicily’s Shiraz, and with the influx of international grape varieties, many Nero d’Avola/Shiraz blends can be found on the market, the two grapes complimenting each other well.

    Mont'Albano Nero D'Avola 'Terre Siciliane'
    Full bodied, rich wine with smooth tannins. Delicious plum and earthy blackberry flavours.

    There are very few plantings of Nero d’Avola overseas, but with its ability to cope so well with hot dry conditions, there are experimental plantings in South Africa, and Australia. We have an excellent example from up-and-coming South Australian winery Unico Zelo who specialise in producing wines from
    Italian varieties.

    Unico Zelo ‘The River’ Nero d’Avola 
    Proudly from some of the most ancient soils on this earth - The Riverland, a complete underdog region that epitomizes what it is to craft fine wine on the edge. Rich red earth, sandy soils covering limestone. A succulent, juicy, aromatic and supremely refreshing wine.

    Don’t just take our word for it, the ancient winemaking traditions of Sicily are back on-trend! NZ Chef Ben Bayly and Auckland Restaurateur Michael Dearth (The Grove, Baduzzi) visited the island last year and selected a number of wines for their tables, including the estate of Tasca in Regaleali…

    Tasca "Guanaccio" Perricone 
    Perricone (or Guanaccio) is one of Sicily's lesser-known indigenous grapes, and we're delighted to have this powerful example on our shelves. Ripe and fruit-forward with thick extraction and rich spiced texture. Perfect with steak or lamb.

    SICILIAN NATURAL WINES

    Sicily has been instrumental in the resurgence of ‘traditional’ winemaking techniques in recent years, with Natural wines made in Roman era clay amphorae becoming found as far afield as New Zealand –Pyramid Valley winemaker Mike Weersing ferments some of his in these large clay vessels “wines from the clay have more umami character and complex aromatics."

    COS Frappato 
    This now-legendary natural wine producer was formed in 1980 when three school friends Giambattista Cilia, Giusto Occhipinti and Pinuccia Strano started experimenting with grapes from their families’ vineyards. The entry to their range, this straight Frappato is light and plush but with so much intensity, complexity and style it is full of cherry and raspberry fruit, herbal and floral notes, and sappy tannins.

    Occhipinti SP68 Terre Siciliane Nero d’Avola Frappato
    Arianna Occhipinti says that her love for wine was sparked when at the age of 16 she went with her uncle (Giusto Occhipinti of COS) to huge wine trade fair Vinitaly. Probably the most well-known of her wines, the SP68 red is purple/red in the glass showing aromas of wild cherries, plum and mulberry with just a touch of raspberry lift. There are hints of flowers, leather, smoke, spice and herbs with wafts of liquorice, earth and mandarin rind. In the mouth the initial attack of fruit is awash with wild cherry sheathed in tobacco leaf with supporting fruit flavours of dark plum and blackberry.

    Shop online for delivery nationwide, or visit us in store to see our full range of Sicilian wines!

  • Applebly Farms A2 Ice Cream

    Appleby Farms is a small collective of farmers who love ice cream and keeping it local. The farmers teamed up with an ice cream alchemist with the goal of creating the most taste-bombing ice cream the world has ever licked.

    These days, Appleby Farms creates luxurious experiences for Kiwi of ice cream lovers. Friends down the road help by supplying wonderful ingredients like ripe, plump boysenberries, freshly roasted coffee and craft chocolate.

    But more than that, they vowed to take the utmost care of the land, the cows and their people, by planting native trees, using water wisely, and supporting their neighbours.

    The A2 Difference

    • Whether a particular cow produces A1 or A2 is significant because certain amino acids influence the breakdown of food. When A1 beta-casein is broken down in the body, a protein fragment called 'beta-casomorphin-7' (BCM7) is created. BCM7 is thought to lead to a number of human ailments. It has, for example, been linked to Type 1 diabetes, heart disease, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and autism. While the link between BCM7 and these diseases is still controversial, it has been suggested that people with a susceptibility to certain diseases should avoid milk containing the Histidine amino acid (A1 or normal milk).
    • In A2 milk products, the troublesome amino acid Histidine in the protein is replaced by the amino acid Proline, and is broken down by the body differently so that no BCM7 is produced.
    • Milk intolerance is a different issue and caused by the inability to digest lactose leading to symptoms such as bloating and cramps. Consumers with milk intolerance have reported an increased ability to tolerate A2 milk products. This could be because of the absence of BCM7 which specifically causes intolerance in some people.
    • Appleby Farms herds are 100% A2 and that is not that common (there is a long conversion lead time to develop an A2 herd ~10+ years).

    Appleby Farms is a classic NZ pasture to plate story. No other ice cream manufacturer in this Category can say they own the paddocks, the cows, drive our milk to the creamery, craft it with care, and deliver this direct to market.

    Appleby Farms have produced some of the creamiest, most delicious ice creams we’ve had the pleasure of tasting with the added bonus of being more stomach-friendly for a lot of people than regular A1 cow milk ice cream.

    The first three flavours available in our Tory Street and Porirua Fresh Markets:

    • Bedford Vanilla Bean Vanilla Ice Cream
    • Doubleshot Ipanema Coffee Ice Cream
    • Bad Boys and Berries Boysenberry Ice Cream

    Coming soon:

    • Brown Eyed Girl Chocolate Brownie Ice Cream
  • Ārahi Alcohol-Free Beverages

    Non-Alcoholic Drinks with style and sophistication.

    Ārahi is a unique new range of non-alcoholic drinks made to satisfy adult tastes and suit their social needs.

    The idea came about when David Wilson, who describes himself as a 'bit of a foodie' and lover of good wine, met and began spending time with Jo-Anne Short, a non-drinker who didn’t enjoy or need alcohol to socialise.

    David began to notice that Jo-Anne was often offered an inferior experience than his when they visited restaurants or bars. David would have numerous options for wine, all served in fine stemware, while Jo-Anne would end up with fizzy drink or juice in a tumbler.

    Jo-Anne became the inspiration for Ārahi when David decided to right what was wrong in the market. He drew on his many years of culinary experience to create a multitude of drinks they could share over dinner and when friends came to visit. The most challenging aspect was length of palate, a flavour journey from the nose to a lingering finish, just like a good wine.

    With the help of a winemaker or two (including Hawkes Bay’s Rod McDonald), David crafted the Ārahi range using the cold-pressed juice of super-premium wine grapes. Only the finest parcels of grapes were used which is one of the critical things that elevates Ārahi from the group of low-priced grape juices that are made from reconstituted table grapes. Also important was the blending process used to turn the super-sweet juice into a refreshing and multi-dimensional experience.

    David, along with the winemakers and a food technologist, worked tirelessly to create a sophisticated and balanced drink. “It took months and many failed methodologies until I finally began to produce drinks that were worthy for us to enjoy together” says David, “I’ll never forget the first night Jo-Anne and I had dinner together like two grown-ups, sharing a bottle of Sparkling Karera from an ice-bucket at the table”.

    Jo-Anne, who cofounded Ārahi with David, was influential in the naming, look and feel of the finished product – all of which reflects her Māori heritage.

    Two Ārahi non-alcoholic beverages are available online and in store at Moore Wilson’s Wine, Beer & Spirits:

    Ārahi Sparkling Karera: When served chilled in an elegant flute this Sparkling Sauvignon Blanc delivers a premium experience that is bursting with flavour. This is a lively and special celebratory beverage that makes alcohol-free drinking a pleasure.

    Light straw in colour with a fine and vibrant bead. The palate is long and racy with kiwifruit and apple. An off-dry style with a lingering finish.

    Food pairing: shellfish, cheese, berries, pasta and seafood.

    Ārahi Kuratea: Named after the Māori word for red, the colour of the rich Merlot grapes from which this gourmet beverage is made.

    Floral on the nose with blackcurrant and vanilla on the palate. A beverage with nicely balanced sweetness and a dry, slightly tannic finish.

    Food pairing: game meats, blue cheese, Asian dishes, beef, beetroot salad.

21-30 of 45

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5