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  • Market Report - Yuzu

    Yuzu are a type of citrus fruit originally from China and then bought to Japan where it was grown for culinary, bathing  and medicinal purposes.

    In New Zealand the fruit is harvested from mid May to July and has limited availability. Yuzu are a hybrid between satsuma and Ichang papeda and are large and bumpy and look like mandarins or lemons. They are very fragrant and smell similar to a combination of grapefruit, mandarin and lemon. They are made up of a thick skin, juice and some pulp and seeds and very little flesh.

    In Japan, yuzu is used for both sweet and savoury dishes. The thick, oily skin can be grated or shredded and goes well in dishes such as noodles, salads, soups, hot and cold drinks, fish and meat dishes and baking. The juice is also highly fragrant and used to marinate fish and meat and to flavour sauces, such as Ponzu sauce.

    Traditionally, hot baths with yuzu skin are taken on winter solstice to ward off any illness and it is also thought to increase good fortune.

    Yuzu are also very nutritious and include high amounts of vitamin C, as well as vitamins A, B6 and thiamine. In Japan hot drinks are often consumed to alleviate cold, aches and flu symptoms. The seeds are also used to treat skin irritations and can be found in natural cosmetics.

    Moore Wilson’s stock fresh yuzu from NZ Yuzu, as well as a number of yuzu products including, All Natural yuzu extract, Lot Eight yuzu cold pressed olive oil and Obento ponzu sauce.

    Recipe Ideas:

    • Marmalade
    • Salad dressings
    • Cold and hot drinks
    • Dipping sauces
    • Marinades and meat rubs
    • Condiments such as mayonnaise
    • In place of other citrus in baked goods
    Recipes

    Yuzu Kosho, courtesy of NZ Yuzu

    Ingredients

    Chillies, preferably green as they are more tender than red but use either

    Salt, 25% of the weight of chillies

    Yuzu skin, same weight or a little less as the chillies

    Method

    1. Put the chillies and salt into a food processor and pulse until finely chopped or turned into a paste (depends on personal preference). Put into mixture into a jar.
    2. Chop up the yuzu skin in a food processor until fine. Alternatively you can grate the zest. Add to the jar with chillies and salt.
    3. Leave for at least three months and up to a year in the fridge before using.

    Add to soups, dipping sauces and as a rub or marinade

    Yuzu, honey and ginger drink

    Ingredients

    Yuzu, skin and juice

    Honey, to taste

    Fresh grated ginger, to taste

    Boiled water

    Method

    Mix all the ingredients together and serve.

     

  • Market Report - Quince

    Quince is a fruit native to Iran and Turkey and now commonly found in Europe. It is particularly popular in Middle Eastern, Spanish and French cuisine. Its appearance is similar to a pear and apple in both size and shape but a little lumpy. The colour of the skin is yellow and can sometimes have fuzz over it, while the flesh is white when raw and goes pink once cooked. Quince have a delicate vanilla, citrus, floral fragrance. They can be eaten raw but are very hard and astringent, however once cooked they soften and become delicate and sweet in flavour.

    Quince are a good source of vitamins and minerals including Vitamin C, fibre, zinc, copper, iron, phosphorus and potassium.

    Choose hard fruit that are green/yellow in colour and firm with no soft spots or bruises. You can store them on the bench top until their fragrance becomes quite strong or in the fridge for up to two weeks. Quince can be eaten both peeled and unpeeled. If unpeeled, rub off the fuzz and wash before cooking.

    Quince can be used in a number of ways including roasting, stewed, baked and poached. They are very high in pectin which makes them great for making jelly, marmalade and jam. They are a delicious addition to sweet pies and crumbles and go well with meats such as lamb and pork. Quince are also delicious on their own as a simple dessert or with porridge or muesli.

    RecipE - Poached Quince

    7 cups (1.75l) water

    1 cup (200g) sugar

    1/2 cup (150g) honey

    1 lemon, cut in half

    1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise

    6 large or 8 medium quince

    1. Mix the water, sugar, honey, lemon and vanilla bean in a large non-reactive pot and turn it on to medium-high heat. You can add any additional spices or seasonings if you wish.
    2. While the liquid is heating, quarter, peel, and remove the cores of the quince.
    3. Put the quince into the pot and cover with a lid
    4. Simmer the quince (do not boil) for at least an hour, until the quince are cooked through.

    Cooking time will vary, depending on the quince. They’re done when they are cooked through, which you can verify by piercing one with the tip of a sharp paring knife. It’s not unusual for them to take up to 2 hours, or more.

    Serve warm, or at room temperature. To store, pour the quince and their liquid into a storage container and refrigerate for up to one week. If you wish to eat only the fruit, you can save the liquid and drizzle it over ice cream or yoghurt or to flavour drinks.

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