Select Your Currency
  • The Greek Food Truck at Moore Wilson's Tory Street

    THEY ARE HERE TO STAY!!!

    The Greek Food Truck took to the road in 2014 and quickly became one of Wellington’s favourite on-the-go dining experiences, bringing high quality, delicious Greek food to the Capital. Voted best food truck in Wellington 2018.

    Sophie and Chef George, both first generation Greeks, love the food truck lifestyle - meeting people, mobility and freedom, and the fact that every day is different!  Priding themselves on creating authentic Greek food. Thier signature dishes include a variety of meat and vegetarian Souvlaki, Salads and Greek sweets.

    View full menu here.

    The Greek Food Truck at Moore Wilson's Opening Hours

    TORY STREET

    Monday to Sunday: 11am to 3pm

    Closing times subject to availability.

    Other 'Food on the Go' offerings at Moore Wilson's Tory Street include the Chook Wagon and Miki Sushi.

  • Queen's Birthday Opening Hours

    Queen's Birthday 2020
    Monday 1st June 

    Tory Street (All Departments): 9am-5pm

    Porirua: 9am-4pm

    Masterton: Closed

    Lower Hutt: Closed

  • Four Pillars x Kyoto Distillery Gin Cocktail

    With the release of the new Four Pillars Changing Seasons Gin comes a new cocktail recipe. A silky smooth winter sipper, with a hit of quirk and zest to impress your most discerning gin pals.

  • Sourdough Bread

    Sourdough is a type of bread made without commercial yeast, and instead uses a natural culture from flour and water called a ‘starter’. When flour and water are mixed lactobacilli bacteria combine with the wild, airborne yeast in the surrounding environment and that mixture ferments and produces gas. When added to bread dough, this mixture is what makes the bread rise and offers the bread a complex flavour and smell – tangy and acidic.

    Sourdough bread can be traced back to Ancient Egyptian civilisations from where it gradually spread throughout Europe and the Middle East and it wasn’t until the 1800’s when it was introduced to America. Current day, many artisan bakers are experimenting with textures and flavours and producing delicious and nutritious sourdough bread.

    The fermentation process of sourdough bread makes it easier to digest that standard, yeasted loaves of bread. The phytic acid in the wheat inhibits enzymes which are needed for our bodies to breakdown the proteins and starch in bread. The lactobacilli and wild yeast found in sourdough neutralise the phytic acid while the dough slowly ferments which enables us to more easily digest sourdough bread. This process also makes other nutrients available to us including calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc.

    You can easily make sourdough bread at home with only a few simple ingredients – flour, water, salt and sourdough starter. Sourdough starters can be made from scratch and takes around 7-10 days. Some bakeries also offer people some of their own starter which can be used to make bread straight away.

    There are many sourdough bread recipes found online as well as many recipe books. Some recommended books are:

    The Tivoli Road Baker, by Michael James with Pippa James – available here

    Tartine Bread, By Chad Robertson

    The Sourdough School, by Vanessa Kimbell

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh also stock a range of sourdough bread from local bakeries including:

  • Market Report - Quince

    Quince is a fruit native to Iran and Turkey and now commonly found in Europe. It is particularly popular in Middle Eastern, Spanish and French cuisine. Its appearance is similar to a pear and apple in both size and shape but a little lumpy. The colour of the skin is yellow and can sometimes have fuzz over it, while the flesh is white when raw and goes pink once cooked. Quince have a delicate vanilla, citrus, floral fragrance. They can be eaten raw but are very hard and astringent, however once cooked they soften and become delicate and sweet in flavour.

    Quince are a good source of vitamins and minerals including Vitamin C, fibre, zinc, copper, iron, phosphorus and potassium.

    Choose hard fruit that are green/yellow in colour and firm with no soft spots or bruises. You can store them on the bench top until their fragrance becomes quite strong or in the fridge for up to two weeks. Quince can be eaten both peeled and unpeeled. If unpeeled, rub off the fuzz and wash before cooking.

    Quince can be used in a number of ways including roasting, stewed, baked and poached. They are very high in pectin which makes them great for making jelly, marmalade and jam. They are a delicious addition to sweet pies and crumbles and go well with meats such as lamb and pork. Quince are also delicious on their own as a simple dessert or with porridge or muesli.

    RecipE - Poached Quince

    7 cups (1.75l) water

    1 cup (200g) sugar

    1/2 cup (150g) honey

    1 lemon, cut in half

    1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise

    6 large or 8 medium quince

    1. Mix the water, sugar, honey, lemon and vanilla bean in a large non-reactive pot and turn it on to medium-high heat. You can add any additional spices or seasonings if you wish.
    2. While the liquid is heating, quarter, peel, and remove the cores of the quince.
    3. Put the quince into the pot and cover with a lid
    4. Simmer the quince (do not boil) for at least an hour, until the quince are cooked through.

    Cooking time will vary, depending on the quince. They’re done when they are cooked through, which you can verify by piercing one with the tip of a sharp paring knife. It’s not unusual for them to take up to 2 hours, or more.

    Serve warm, or at room temperature. To store, pour the quince and their liquid into a storage container and refrigerate for up to one week. If you wish to eat only the fruit, you can save the liquid and drizzle it over ice cream or yoghurt or to flavour drinks.

  • Rita's Feijoa Flummery with Passionfruit Caramel

    Before we opened, Sarah Mackenzie worked with me to envisage our desserts at Rita. We wanted to focus on old fashioned desserts. With thoughtful research and recipe testing, Sarah unearthed a recipe published by Lois Daish in 1996. I assume Lois in turn updated this old fashioned dessert using feijoas. Their flavour shines through, unobstructed by dairy or eggs.

    We used it in a layer cake with coconut sponge and bay leaf-passionfruit caramel, but as Lois says, serving with plenty of runny cream is a fine idea. I prefer to use under-ripe feijoa for this recipe, both for a better colour and more acidic flavour.

     

    Recipe shared by Kelda Hains & Sarah Mackenzie for Moore Wilson's 2020 Calendar.

    Rita
    89 Aro Street
    rita.co.nz

     

     

  • Coastal Spring Lamb

    Richard and Suze Redmayne founded Coastal Spring Lamb in 2010.

    Coastal Spring Lamb’s unique point of difference is its coastal provenance, which produces succulent and tender lamb that is ‘naturally seasoned by the sea’.

    Since 2010, 17 inter-generational farming families have joined the Coastal Spring Lamb family and together they now supply their lambs to specialist food stores, supermarkets and restaurants throughout New Zealand and Asia.

    The lambs are all raised on family farms located on the East and West coasts of the North Island, where the salt-laden coastal winds from the Tasman Sea and Pacific Ocean continually dust their herb-filled pastures.

    All of the Coastal Spring lamb farming families share a passion for their environment and for raising happy and healthy lambs - with no chemicals, no antibiotics and no hormones.

    You can meet the Coastal Spring Lamb families and learn more about them and their farms by visiting the Coastal Spring lamb website at coastallamb.com

    The website also provides some helpful cooking tips and great recipes.

    The business prides itself on their genuine paddock to plate offering and the relationships they have developed with their customers.

    Richard is always keen to answer any questions you may have so feel free to get in touch – his details are on the website.

    Coastal Spring Lamb - Naturally seasoned by the sea.  Taste the difference!

  • Miss Fortune's Warm Apple & Cinnamon Donuts

    Recipe shared by Freya Atkinson & Becky Guppy for Moore Wilson's 2020 Calendar.

    Miss Fortune's 
    105 Hutt Park Road, Seaview
    Find them on Facebook

     

     

  • Preserving

    Preserving is a great way to enjoy the season’s best flavours at any time of the year. Pick what’s in ample supply (e.g. berries and stonefruit in Summer, pears in Winter) and preserve to enjoy year round.

    The aim of preserving is to slow down the activity of microorganisms and enzymes or destroy them altogether. Here’s a few common methods of preserving:

    Freezing - the colder the food, the slower the rate of deterioration. Freezing only slows down enzyme activity so vegetables must be blanched in boiling water first.

    Heat - boiling or blanching at high temperatures destroys enzyme activity and almost all microorganisms. Boiled preserves must be sealed in airless conditions to prolong their shelf life.

    Strong Concentrations - alcohol, acid, salt and sugar in high concentrations either prevent or destroy microorganisms. The method used will depend on what you’re preserving.

    Essential Equipment
    - Small ladle for potting all types of preserves.
    - Slotted spoon for poaching and skimming
    - Wooden spoon for stirring
    - Tongs for removing items when heat processing
    - Jam/sugar thermometer for accurate temperature taking
    - Hydrometer - useful for brewing to measure the alcohol content
    - Wide mouth funnel for potting up preserves
    - Long spouted funnel for bottling drinks and sauces
    - Cheesecloth for filtering and straining liquids
    - Jelly bag for straining fruit pulp
    - Muslin cloth for straining, wrapping meats or making spice bags
    - Food processor to save time and effort when mixing, blitzing, mashing or pulping
    - Large plastic container with drip tray for brining and curing meats
    - Stainless steel preserving pan— a specialist, non-reactive, heavy based pan for rapid boiling.

    Containers
    The right container can make all the difference when preserving. Containers must always be in good condition and steralised before use.

    - Clear glass bottle - used with an airtight cork these are perfect for wine, cider and cordials
    (alternatively use a swing stopper bottle)
    - Ice cube box for freezing small portions of herbs
    - Plastic freezer containers for freezing jams, fruit, vegetables, purees and sauces.
    - Jam jars for storing jams, chutneys, jellies etc. A new lid or waxed disc is essential every time.
    - Corks for stopping home brews.
    - Ramekin dish for potting up meat and fish or butter, cheese and jellies.
    - Specialist preserving jars - heat resistant, with non-corrosive lids and replaceable seals.

    Ingredients
    - Salt - draws out the moisture in food. Can be used for preserving vegetables, meat and fish.
    - Sugar - just as effective as salt when used in high concentrations (60% +). Mostly used to preserve fruit or used with vinegar to preserve fruit and vegetable mixes such as chutneys.
    - Fats - not a preserving agent but used to protect some preserved foods by forming a protective  seal.
    - Vinegars - prevents the growth of microorganisms. Mostly used to preserve vegetables as  pickles, relishes and sauces.
    - Lemons - used when making jams. Adding lemon draws out the pectin, helping the mixture set.
    - Spices and flavourings - enhances flavour of preserves and can even actively help the  preserving process.

    Check out our selection of preserving books, tools and equipment available online for delivery nationwide or visit our Variety Departments for the full range.

    Featured image: Apricot Tangelo Marmalata from Rowan Bishop 'With Relish'. Photograph by Carolyn Robertson.

1-10 of 210

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 21