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  • Moore Wilson's Centenary Timeline

    On 1st June 2018 Moore Wilson's are be celebrating 100 years in business! Following are some of the key events and highlights from our first 100 years:

    Frederick William Moore

    Frederick William Moore

    6th April 1892: Frederick William Moore, founder of Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd, arrives in Wellington. Frederick was born in West Derby, Liverpool on 26th August 1868. At age 24, in search of new opportunities, Frederick booked a passage to Wellington, New Zealand aboard the R.M.S Arawa.

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    1st June 1918: Frederick Moore officially opens Moore Wilson & Co Ltd. First premises in Wakefield St.

    Wilson Withdraws

    2nd December 1919: J.H. Wilson, an original director and naming partner of Moore Wilson’s,  withdraws from the partnership. According to Frederick’s son Stan, Mr Wilson left as he didn’t see a future for the business but Frederick liked the ‘Moore Wilson’ name so kept it on.  

    Lorne Street

    Lorne Street

    1927: After purchasing land in 1923, a custom built warehouse is opened on Lorne Street, just down the road from Moore Wilson’s current site.

    Second Generation

    Second Generation

    Mid 1930’s: Frederick’s son Stanley Osborne Moore commences full time work with the company.

    Masterton Store

    Masterton Store

    1944: Moore Wilson’s second store opens on Dixon Street, Masterton, on the site of Cameron’s Service Station.

    Lorne St Closes

    March 1956: Due to extreme pressure on store space and handling and an uncooperative City Council, Moore Wilson’s are forced to shut down their Wellington operations.

    Ross Cole Investments

    Ross Cole Investments

    Late 1956: Capital from selling Lorne Street property and plant is used to start up Ross Cole Investments Ltd, specialising in motor vehicle hire purchases. Company offices were on Oriental Bay, with the business running until the early 1980’s.

    Third Generation

    Third Generation

    August 1960: Current Managing Director, Graeme Moore, starts work full time.

    Masterton Travel Centre

    Masterton Travel Centre

    1960: Moore Wilson’s purchase and operate the Masterton Travel Centre. Closed in 1971.

    Porirua Store

    Porirua Store

    1960: Moore Wilson’s re-enters the Wellington region with a new store on Kenepuru Drive. This is the company’s first ‘self service’ cash n’ carry store.

    Miramar Store

    Miramar Store

    1964: A store is opened on Miramar’s Maupuia Peninsula. Moore Wilson’s now has three stores operating.

    Wright Street

    Wright Street

    1969: Miramar store closes and operations are moved to a larger warehouse in Wright Street, Mt Cook.

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    1969: The Moore Wilson’s card is introduced to help provide a more efficient, tailored service for Trade Customers. Previously trade only, the card is also a way around zoning laws, allowing non-trade customers to shop with a wholesaler.

    Porirua Flood

    Porirua Flood

    20th December 1976: The Kenepuru stream bursts its banks causing a massive flash flood at the Porirua store. Some 30 people, including staff and Christmas shoppers, had to be taken to the roof and ferried to safety by officers from the Porirua Fire Brigade. Stock damage was estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

    Bigger & Better

    Bigger & Better

    Early 1977: After being redesigned by Athfield Architects, the Porirua store reopens just months after the devastating flood.

    Upper Hutt

    Upper Hutt

    1978: A fourth Cash & Carry store is opened in Upper Hutt.

    Home on Tory Street

    Home on Tory Street

    12th August 1983: Moore Wilson’s purchase the Thomson, Lewis & Co. Ltd property on the corner of Tory & College Streets. In the early 1900’s Thomson Lewis were Wellington’s major soft drink producer. The site is home to a pure artesian water bore.

    Moving Again

    Moving Again

    10th September 1984: After building at Tory Street is complete, the Wright Street store is closed and Moore Wilson’s move to our current home. Just in time, as  Wellington’s cafe and restaurant scene was taking off.

    Dominion Tavern

    Dominion Tavern

    1986: Originally built in the early 20th century, the Dominion Tavern (adjoining to Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store) was purchased. Moore Wilson’s ran the pub for four years before it was demolished in 1991 to extend the store.

    Wingate Store

    Wingate Store

    1989: Moore Wilson’s Wingate store opens. All of the foodservice products at Upper Hutt were moved to Wingate, leaving Upper Hutt a Variety only store until its closure in 1998.

    Liquor Category Added

    Liquor Category Added

    1991: The Dominion Tavern was demolished and Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store extended towards Lorne Street. On the licensed site of the old Dominion, liquor was now available for sale at Moore Wilson’s.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1991: Julie Moore, current Executive Director, started full time in the role of Liquor Buyer.

    Cuisine Centre

    Cuisine Centre

    1997: The Cuisine Centre opens in Tory Street, providing Wellington’s only cooking demonstration kitchen. Local and international chefs held demonstrations and the room was available for suppliers and hospitality training companies to hire.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1998: Nick Moore commences full time work. Today Nick looks after operations for all four stores and is the Tory Street Store Manager.

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    December 1998: Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market, a concept believed to be a world first, opens on Lorne Street on the site of the old Elim Church. The naysayers said it wouldn’t last, but after just two days the store was so busy that Graeme had to pull the advertising.

    Porirua Fresh

    Porirua Fresh

    1999: The Fresh category is introduced at Moore Wilson’s Porirua.

    An Evening with Jamie

    An Evening with Jamie

    May 2000: Jamie Oliver visits Moore Wilson’s Wellington, with a large crowd filling the entire lower carpark. Jamie, then just 25 years old, entertained with his signature Essex charm, demonstrating recipes at the event MC’d by Wellington food personality Ruth Pretty.

    Masterton Fresh

    Masterton Fresh

    2002: Fresh category introduced at Moore Wilson’s Masterton.

    Restaurant Association Award

    Restaurant Association Award

    2002: Moore Wilson’s Fresh awarded Innovator Award by Restaurant Association of New Zealand.

    Cuisine Award

    Cuisine Award

    2004: Moore Wilson’s Fresh named Supreme Winner of the Cuisine and Matua Valley Wines Awards of Innovation and Excellence.

    Porirua Farmers Market

    Porirua Farmers Market

    July 2006: A weekly market called Moore Wilson’s Farmer’s Fresh begins, running on Saturday mornings in the bulk warehouse across the carpark from the main Porirua store. The market closed in 2010.

    New Fresh Market

    New Fresh Market

    December 2008: After outgrowing the original space, a new larger Fresh Market is opened on the College Street side of Moore Wilson’s Wellington site. Liquor moves from inside Grocery to the standalone building that housed the old Fresh Market.

    Dibble in the Piazza

    Dibble in the Piazza

    April 2009: A sculpture by renowned Manawatu artist Paul Dibble is unveiled in the Tory Street Piazza to tell the story of the artesian bore that runs under the site.

    Fresh Workshops

    Fresh Workshops

    March 2011: Fresh Workshops begin. Workshops ran on Thursday mornings from 2011 to 2015 in a room off Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Fresh and were hosted by guest chefs, bakers, food personalities, and cookbook authors.

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    2012: Graeme & Julie Moore awarded Wellingtonians of the Year in the Business category of The Wellys.

    The Chook Wagon

    The Chook Wagon

    August 2012: The Chook Wagon opens in the carpark above Moore Wilson’s Wellington Fresh Market, recreating the traditional French ‘Poulet Rotisserie’ experience served from a replica of the iconic 1947 Citroen H-van. The Citroen was designed and built by Miramar’s Human Dynamo Workshop.

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    December 2013: O’Sushi opens in a custom built kiosk in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory St.

    Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct

    March 2014: Moore Wilson’s launch first e-commerce website “Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct”. The website featured a small hand-picked range of wines available for delivery nationwide.

    Berry Culture

    Berry Culture

    September 2014: The Berry Culture frozen yoghurt truck parked up in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory Street, serving natural yoghurt with live cultures and a range of premium topping. The Citroen hit the road in March 2016, returning to Christchurch.

    Moore Wilson’s Online

    October 2015: A new website “Moore Wilson’s Online” is launched with an increased range of wine, beers, and spirits as well as products from the Kitchen and Homeware department available to purchase online. Content including recipes, events, supplier profiles and product trends is also added.

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    April 2016: Pop-Up Food Pods are introduced in the Tory Street Piazza with the aim of giving our trade customers and suppliers the chance to showcase their cafes, restaurants, food trucks, and products.

    Building Strengthening

    Building Strengthening

    June 2016: 18 months of building strengthening work by L.T. McGuinness at Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Store are completed. The new buckling-restrained braces had their first test (and passed with flying colours) when the Kaikoura earthquake struck in November.

    Business Hall of Fame

    Business Hall of Fame

    July 2016: Moore Wilson’s inducted into the Wellington Region Business Hall of Fame.

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    July 2017: With the help of Human Dynamo, Porirua’s standalone Wine, Beer & Spirits store underwent a nautical makeover, paying homage to the regions sea-side location.

    Felix Awards

    Felix Awards

    October 2017: Moore Wilson’s accept the award for Outstanding Supplier at the 2017 Felix Awards.

    O’Sushi Porirua

    O’Sushi Porirua

    November 2017: O’Sushi opens at Moore Wilson’s Porirua. The exterior features a stunning painting of Mana Island by Human Dynamo director Sue Dorrington, continuing the nautical theme from the Wine, Beer & Spirits store across the carpark.

    Celebrating 100 Years

    Celebrating 100 Years

    1st June 2018: Moore Wilson’s celebrates 100 years in business.

  • Celebrating our Centenary

    This June we're celebrating turning 100 by rewarding our loyal customers with spot prizes and giveaways!

    Shop in store during June and you could take home 1 of 100 amazing spot prizes. These will be allocated to cardholders at random at the checkout - there's a wide range of prizes including appliances, cheeseboards, local chocolate and coffee experiences, and even toy robots! Be sure to shop using your Moore Wilson's card to be eligible for a spot prize.

    We also have 10 extra special Cardholder Giveaways running, shop using your Moore Wilson's Card during June to automatically be in the draw to win one of the following:

    • KitchenAid Stand Mixer KSM170 (Silver) valued at $1039 with purchase of any KitchenAid appliance.
    • Set of two Victorinox Spectra Suitcases (White) valued at over $1700 with purchase of any Victorinox luggage or knife.
    • A LEGO prize pack worth over $500 with spend of $50+, in one transaction, on LEGO.
    • Red Vespa Primavera 50cc with purchase of Shore Mariner Frozen Vannamei Prawn Cutlets 26/30 1kg.
    • $1000 worth of Moore Wilson's Gift Vouchers with purchase of any 2 packs of Moore Wilson’s Branded Nuts, Dried Fruit, Herbs, or Spices.
    • A trip for two to Rome worth $7500 - including a visit to the La Molisana factory with spend of $10 (including GST), in one transaction, on La Molisana products.
    • A Central Otago Experience for two with Winemaker Rudi Bauer with purchase of any 2 bottles of Quartz Reef Wine.
    • A five course lunch for two at Featherston’s Wharekauhau Lodge, along with a Te Kairanga Wine and Lighthouse Gin tasting in Martinborough with purchase of any 2 bottles of Te Kairanga Estate Wine.
    • A weekend stay in Hawkes Bay including a winery visit, vineyard tour and tasting at Te Mata Estate with purchase of any 2 bottles of Te Mata Estate Wine.
    • A trip for two people, for three nights in the Barossa with Yalumba valued at $4000 with purchase of any 2 bottles of Yalumba Wine.

    Visit your nearest Moore Wilson's store for more details
    and to be in to win!

    Not a cardholder? Sign up here.

  • Queen Sally's Cacao & Berry Celebration Cake

    Recipe from the 2018 Moore Wilson's Calendar. Thank you to Queen Sally's Diamond Deli for creating this beautiful celebration cake for our Centenary month!

  • Ti Kouka's Beetroot & Kumara Gnocchi with Blue Cheese Cream

    Light and fluffy gnocchi parcels with a decadent blue cheese sauce from the talented culinary team at Ti Kouka Cafe. Serves 4.

  • The Best Brussels Sprouts

    A member of the Brassica family, Brussels Sprouts are, of course, named after the city of Brussels where they are thought to have originated. There are two main growing areas in New Zealand. The first is Ohakune in the central North Island. It tends to produce smaller sprouts with compact heads These become available early in the season (autumn). The second major growing area is Oamaru in North Otago where they  produce slightly larger sprouts  using a different sprout variety. Oamaru sprouts arrive later in the season and have a sweeter flavour.

    Brussels Sprouts are very good for you because they are a rich source of phytochemicals including glucosinolates, carotenoids and phenolic compounds. They are an excellent source of vitamin C, folate and also a good source of B group vitamins. Brussels Sprouts also contain sulforaphane, a chemical believed to have anti-cancer properties. (Note that boiling reduces the amount of anticancer compounds but steaming and sautéing do not result in significant loss.)

    Traditionally Brussels Sprouts are usually boiled or steamed but whatever cooking method you use, they do need to carefully cooked. Overcooking has been responsible for sometimes giving  sprouts a bad reputation because overcooking results in the release of high amounts of sulfur that badly affects the smell and taste. So, however you cook your sprouts, avoid overcooking at all costs.

    With the addition of butter and bacon, this simple recipe from Annabel Langbein is sure to convert even those who would normally turn up their nose at Brussels sprouts!

  • Moore Wilson's Pop-Up Food Pods

     

    Joining the Chook Wagon and Miki Sushi, Pop-up Food Pods are the latest addition to our takeaway food offering! 

    Located in the Piazza at Moore Wilson's College Street, Food Pods provide a chance for local artisans to 'pop-up' for a limited time and share their take on street food direct to the Wellington public. Here's what's on right now:

    Pod 1: Olive.

    Proprietors, Head Chef Jamie Morgan and brothers Ferdi and Carlo Petagna, first came into contact in 2008 at Fratelli on Blair Street, which the brothers had just opened. A few years later the boys reunited to try their hand at something a bit different, which they found in Olive. With prominent careers in the Wellington and Australian hospitality industries their combined experience and friendship is reflected in the unique and friendly atmosphere at Olive.

    A Cuba Street favourite, Olive is known for its innovative menu that showcases the best of fresh local and seasonal produce - the best the region has to offer.

    Olive is closed until 18th July for earthquake strengthening but you don’t have to miss out – they’ll be serving up some favourites from the Moore Wilson’s Pop-Up Pods!

    POP-UP MENU

    Bacon buttie with tomato kasundi $9

    Slow cooked pork ribs with slaw and ranch dressing $12

    Line caught tuna melt with salad $12

    HOURS

    Monday to Sunday 9.30am to 3.00pm

    Here until Sunday 8th July 2018.

     

    Pod 2: Fratelli 

    Fratelli translates as Brothers, a fitting name for one of Wellington’s top Italian restaurants, owned by brother’s Ferdi and Carlo Petagna. Opened in March 2009 the brothers set out to give Wellington something that was missing from its dining scene, a good quality Italian restaurant serving fresh Italian cuisine.

    At Fratelli the concept is Fresh Italian. It takes bits of the old traditional Italian cooking styles and assembles them with new modern ideas, with a menu that changes seasonally ensuring only the freshest ingredients are used.

    POP-UP MENU

    Vegetable minestrone with orzo & parmesan $8

    Orecchiette pasta with braised Lamb Ragu OR Bacon, black pepper & cheesy Parmesan sauce $12

    Vanilla Panna Cotta with boysenberry coulis $4

    HOURS
    Monday to Sunday 11.00am to 3.00pm

    Here until Sunday 1st July 2018.

  • New Zealand Honey

    Honey has a long history of human consumption. Apparently humans began hunting for honey at least 8000 years ago as evidenced by some ancient cave paintings found in Spain. Honey is also found in the records of ancient Egypt and it is acknowledged that the art of beekeeping has existed in China since time immemorial.

    Honey, of course, is made by bees using nectar from flowers. Honey gets its sweetness from a combination of fructose and glucose. These two sugars don’t need to be broken down by our digestive system so honey is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, giving a quick energy boost to the body.

    The flavour of the honey depends on the plants and flowers where the bees have collected their nectar and this is why New Zealand honey is quite special. New Zealand’s long isolation from the rest of the world and its island biogeography means that the flora and fauna here is extraordinarily unique. About 80% of this flora only occurs in New Zealand and this uniqueness has a remarkable influence on our locally produced honey. One of the most common examples of this unique flora is Manuka, a local evergreen tree. The intensely scented Manuka flowers bloom in summer and bees absolutely love them.

    Today there is even a registered trademark called UMF which means Unique Manuka Factors. It has become a world renowned trademark because Manuka honey is internationally acknowledged as having anti-bacterial properties that remarkably support the body's health and well-being. In particular 15+ Manuka Honey is being increasingly used in the treatment of burns.

    Along with being renowned for its health properties, Manuka honey is a wonderful eating experience. The dark cream to dark brown honey has a distinctive taste profile; slightly bitter, herbaceous, with intense woody and slightly nutty flavour notes.

    In fact New Zealand’s unique flora results in a wide range of different honey flavours and our local honey producers are making the most of this uniqueness. Mono-floral (single flower) honeys are  increasingly popular and honeys available include Beechwood, Pohutakawa, Kamahi, Rata, Tawari, Rewarewa and also honey made from imported field flora such as clover and thyme and various wild flowers (such as bugloss). The diversity of the New Zealand honey range is quite outstanding.

    Honey colour ranges from almost colourless to dark amber brown.  In general, honeys from forest floral sources are darker in colour and richer in flavour while honeys from field floral sources are lighter in colour with a delicate fine flavour. And honey, of course, can be presented in a variety of forms including comb, liquid and creamed.

    NZ Honey brands available from Moore Wilson's Fresh include Airborne (Canterbury), Arataki (Hawkes Bay), J Bush and Sons (Blenheim), Earthbound (Auckland), J Friend & Co. (Christchurch), Local Flavour (Wellington), and Silverstream (Upper Hutt).

    There are many wide and varied uses for honey including:

    FOOD

    • The most common use of honey is to simply serve it on bread or toast. Increasingly popular is a little honey mixed with your breakfast muesli
    • It is also widely used as sweetener in baking, as an ingredient in glazes, or as a flavourful addition in Asian dishes
    • Use to sweeten your homemade nut milks
    • For something different, try infusing your honey with different flavour combinations like ginger and lime or apple cider and dried figs

    HEALTH

    • Honey is a natural antiseptic so will help to heal wounds, cuts, scraps and burns
    • Combine with the juice of one lemon to sooth sore throats and coughs
    • Combine equal parts honey, vinegar and water and drink to remove parasites

    BEAUTY

    • Use as a moisturizer, simply rub on to dry or patchy skin and let it sit for around 30 minutes before washing off
    • Add a teaspoon to your normal shampoo to help smooth damaged locks
    • Relax and soak your skin in a soothing honey bath – dissolve 2 tablespoons of honey in 1 cup hot water and add to your bath along with a couple of drops of lavender oil
    • Combine 2 teaspoons of milk with 2 tablespoons of honey for a natural face mask. Cover your face and let it sit for 10 minutes before washing off
  • Country Trading Co. Supplier to Growers and Makers

    Based in Nelson, Country Trading Co. is a family business founded in 2008 by passionate foodie and gardener, Heather Cole. Their product range grew (literally) from the things Heather needed to live the good life, making cheese, preserving and growing food.

    Now well established as the supply store for growers and makers, Country Trading Co. products enable people to grow and make great food at home.

    Heather and the team develop recipes and design and source equipment and ingredients. Each product is carefully researched and tested in real gardens and kitchens to ensure it passes the “use it every day” test.

    Their new range of home dairy equipment and cultures even involved establishing a starter culture laboratory, affectionately known as the Culture Cupboard, where the team blend artisan live starter cultures for a range of dairy and non-dairy ferments.

    Passionate about good food and the environment, much of their product development has a sustainable and clean food focus. Some, like the stainless steel fermenting flask, is designed to help people remove regular plastic purchases from their weekly shop.

    Heather has noticed a continued increase in the awareness of food ingredients and origins over the last decade, driving more people to get in their gardens and kitchens and make real food at home.

    “Real food can be life-changing, and we get such a kick out of helping people reconnect with the basic acts of growing and making. When someone sends us a photo of their first Camembert we still all stop what we’re doing and admire it – it’s just wonderful.”

    To see the Country Trading Co. journey watch this short clip celebrating their first decade: https://youtu.be/jKj6aBLm4QY

    The following Country Trading Co. products are available from Moore Wilson’s Kitchen & Homewares. Where the product is linked, it is also available online to delivery nationwide:

    Organic Cotton Cheesecloth
    This GOTS certified organic cotton cheesecloth is easy on the environment and the perfect weave for straining everything from jellies, curds or nut milk to bone broths.  Sourced with care from an organic farm and textile mill this reusable cloth comes in a 1.55m x 1.08m length packed in plastic-free card.

    Cheesemakers Foundation Pack
    If you are beginning your home dairy journey this pack has the foundation equipment you need. A dairy thermometer, organic cotton cheese cloth and pack of pH strips.  A Foundation Pack and one of the “How To Make” recipe books is the perfect gift for the curious foodie.

    Make Your Own Butter & Yogurt Kit
    Yogurt and butter are everyday grocery items in many homes. Making them at home opens up a world of possibilities. This kit includes quality equipment, ingredients, and recipes for making everything from cultured butter to spreadable butter, Greek yogurt, probiotic and flavoured yogurts.

    Make Your Own Camembert & Brie Kit
    Camembert & Brie are perfect introductory artisan cheeses to make at home. They require small quantities of milk and are fast to mature. This kit includes stainless steel hoops, French cheese paper, ingredients and an 82-page recipe book for many different white mould cheeses.

    Artisan Butter Paddles
    When you make butter at home, these wooden paddles help you work it into little balls or blocks without getting your warm hands involved.  (They are also great for rolling gnocchi).  Made from FSC accredited sustainable wood and packaged in a plastic-free box.

    Artisan Cheese Hoop
    Traditional, slow-draining, cheese hoops are perfect for making gravity pressed lactic curd cheeses such as Camembert and washed rind cheeses. Each stainless steel hoop comes with two flipping boards to assist with the even drainage.

    How to Make Butter & Yogurt
    Learn to make consistently fantastic yogurts and butter at home with this 82-page book. Includes recipes for cultured, spreadable and flavored butter and all yogurts from Greek to drinking, flavored and frozen.  Learn about milk, cultures, methods, and equipment for delicious dairy at home.

    How to Make Soft Cheese
    This 82-page book is like having a tutor in your kitchen, learn the secrets to making over a dozen artisan soft cheeses including recipes for mascarpone, crème Fraiche, cream cheese, cottage cheese, fromage blanc, wood smoked ricotta, paneer and more.

    How to Make Camembert & Brie
    Learn how to make, age and eat artisan white mould cheeses like Camembert and Brie. With over 20 different recipes and variations, small quantities of milk and short maturing times, this is a perfect introduction to artisan cheesemaking at home.

    Stainless Steel Fermenting Flask
    This 1-litre capacity flask includes a glass jar with stainless steel storage lid and full instructions on how to ferment dairy and non-dairy yogurts at home. It is also perfect for culturing butter and soft cheeses such as crème Fraiche and cream cheese.  A plastic-free product.

    Dairy Thermometer
    Temperature is important when culturing dairy products at home. This dairy thermometer comes complete with a cardboard tube to protect it’s calibration when it is rattling around in your kitchen drawer. A plastic-free product.

    Specialist Cheese Paper
    Cheese is a living thing, and these generous squares of French specialist cheese paper are engineered to let the cheese breath and the rind develop as the cheeses mature. Each pack contains 16 sheets of paper, 18 labels and sealing stickers (two extras for muck ups).

    Soft Cheese Baskets (set of 5)
    This set of 5 Italian Soft Cheese Baskets are designed to drain a range of soft cheeses like Ricotta, cottage cheese, crème Fraiche and quark. The set includes 3 round and 2 square baskets of different shapes and sizes to match to cover the most popular soft cheeses.

    Cheese Storage Box
    The refrigerator is not a friendly place for cheese. This cheese storage box lets you mature and store cheeses in the refrigerator in a humid environment with enough airflow to let the cheese breathe. The cheese box is an essential product for makers and lovers of good cheese.

    Natural Sea Salt
    This brining and pickling salt is an unprocessed raw salt, extracted by solar evaporation of sea water in Marlborough. It is free from anti-caking agents and iodine which makes it great for use in brines, cheeses, ferments, cures, and pickles. Because it is unprocessed, it retains high levels of minerals.

    Seed Saver Envelopes
    A perfect gift for growers! A pack of 20 envelopes for saving seeds with a guide to write where and when each seed was gathered. Each pack includes notes on heirloom seeds and how to save them. Plastic-free product made from recycled paper.

     

    Because they need to be kept chilled, Culture Cupboard products can be found in the freezer of Moore Wilson's Fresh:

    Culture Cupboard – Probiotic Yogurt Culture
    The Culture Cupboard® generous ten pack of probiotic yogurt culture contains four strains of lactic bacteria and probiotics to make fresh yogurt at home. Each pack makes 1-2 litres of thick, tangy yogurt, bursting with bugs.

    Culture Cupboard – Thick & Creamy Yogurt Culture
    The Culture Cupboard® ten pack of yogurt culture makes 1-2 litres (1-2 quarts) per pack of thick, creamy yogurt. This culture is the one for those who like a seriously thick, mildly flavoured yogurt. Perfect for smoothies, dips, cooking, kiddds and creamy breakfast pots.

    Culture Cupboard – Soft Cheese Culture
    The Culture Cupboard® five pack of Soft Cheese culture contains five sachets; each makes 4 liters of milk into a wide range of soft cheeses. A blend of four different culture strains for use in everything from Feta to Cream Cheese and Cultured Butter.

    Culture Cupboard – Vegetarian Rennet
    The Culture Cupboard® five pack of Vegetarian Rennet contains five sachets; each makes 6 litres (6 quarts) of milk into a wide range of soft and hard cheeses.  We use this rennet because it creates no bitterness in the finished cheese and it is also the rennet of choice for several of our favourite artisan cheesemakers.

     

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