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  • Shoflor: Moroccan-Style Cauliflower

    Recipe by Yonit Tzukerman from the book 'Cauliflower' by Oz Telem.

    The fresh tomatoes and spice in the sauce mingles with the triple-cooked cauliflower florets to create a satisfying meaty sensation without any meat!

  • Moore Wilson's Centenary Timeline

    On 1st June 2018 Moore Wilson's are be celebrating 100 years in business! Following are some of the key events and highlights from our first 100 years:

    Frederick William Moore

    Frederick William Moore

    6th April 1892: Frederick William Moore, founder of Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd, arrives in Wellington. Frederick was born in West Derby, Liverpool on 26th August 1868. At age 24, in search of new opportunities, Frederick booked a passage to Wellington, New Zealand aboard the R.M.S Arawa.

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    Moore Wilson & Co. Ltd

    1st June 1918: Frederick Moore officially opens Moore Wilson & Co Ltd. First premises in Wakefield St.

    Wilson Withdraws

    2nd December 1919: J.H. Wilson, an original director and naming partner of Moore Wilson’s,  withdraws from the partnership. According to Frederick’s son Stan, Mr Wilson left as he didn’t see a future for the business but Frederick liked the ‘Moore Wilson’ name so kept it on.  

    Lorne Street

    Lorne Street

    1927: After purchasing land in 1923, a custom built warehouse is opened on Lorne Street, just down the road from Moore Wilson’s current site.

    Second Generation

    Second Generation

    Mid 1930’s: Frederick’s son Stanley Osborne Moore commences full time work with the company.

    Masterton Store

    Masterton Store

    1944: Moore Wilson’s second store opens on Dixon Street, Masterton, on the site of Cameron’s Service Station.

    Lorne St Closes

    March 1956: Due to extreme pressure on store space and handling and an uncooperative City Council, Moore Wilson’s are forced to shut down their Wellington operations.

    Ross Cole Investments

    Ross Cole Investments

    Late 1956: Capital from selling Lorne Street property and plant is used to start up Ross Cole Investments Ltd, specialising in motor vehicle hire purchases. Company offices were on Oriental Bay, with the business running until the early 1980’s.

    Third Generation

    Third Generation

    August 1960: Current Managing Director, Graeme Moore, starts work full time.

    Masterton Travel Centre

    Masterton Travel Centre

    1960: Moore Wilson’s purchase and operate the Masterton Travel Centre. Closed in 1971.

    Porirua Store

    Porirua Store

    1960: Moore Wilson’s re-enters the Wellington region with a new store on Kenepuru Drive. This is the company’s first ‘self service’ cash n’ carry store.

    Miramar Store

    Miramar Store

    1964: A store is opened on Miramar’s Maupuia Peninsula. Moore Wilson’s now has three stores operating.

    Wright Street

    Wright Street

    1969: Miramar store closes and operations are moved to a larger warehouse in Wright Street, Mt Cook.

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    Moore Wilson’s Card

    1969: The Moore Wilson’s card is introduced to help provide a more efficient, tailored service for Trade Customers. Previously trade only, the card is also a way around zoning laws, allowing non-trade customers to shop with a wholesaler.

    Porirua Flood

    Porirua Flood

    20th December 1976: The Kenepuru stream bursts its banks causing a massive flash flood at the Porirua store. Some 30 people, including staff and Christmas shoppers, had to be taken to the roof and ferried to safety by officers from the Porirua Fire Brigade. Stock damage was estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

    Bigger & Better

    Bigger & Better

    Early 1977: After being redesigned by Athfield Architects, the Porirua store reopens just months after the devastating flood.

    Upper Hutt

    Upper Hutt

    1978: A fourth Cash & Carry store is opened in Upper Hutt.

    Home on Tory Street

    Home on Tory Street

    12th August 1983: Moore Wilson’s purchase the Thomson, Lewis & Co. Ltd property on the corner of Tory & College Streets. In the early 1900’s Thomson Lewis were Wellington’s major soft drink producer. The site is home to a pure artesian water bore.

    Moving Again

    Moving Again

    10th September 1984: After building at Tory Street is complete, the Wright Street store is closed and Moore Wilson’s move to our current home. Just in time, as  Wellington’s cafe and restaurant scene was taking off.

    Dominion Tavern

    Dominion Tavern

    1986: Originally built in the early 20th century, the Dominion Tavern (adjoining to Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store) was purchased. Moore Wilson’s ran the pub for four years before it was demolished in 1991 to extend the store.

    Wingate Store

    Wingate Store

    1989: Moore Wilson’s Wingate store opens. All of the foodservice products at Upper Hutt were moved to Wingate, leaving Upper Hutt a Variety only store until its closure in 1998.

    Liquor Category Added

    Liquor Category Added

    1991: The Dominion Tavern was demolished and Moore Wilson’s Tory Street store extended towards Lorne Street. On the licensed site of the old Dominion, liquor was now available for sale at Moore Wilson’s.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1991: Julie Moore, current Executive Director, started full time in the role of Liquor Buyer.

    Cuisine Centre

    Cuisine Centre

    1997: The Cuisine Centre opens in Tory Street, providing Wellington’s only cooking demonstration kitchen. Local and international chefs held demonstrations and the room was available for suppliers and hospitality training companies to hire.

    Fourth Generation

    Fourth Generation

    1998: Nick Moore commences full time work. Today Nick looks after operations for all four stores and is the Tory Street Store Manager.

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    A Fresh Way of Thinking

    December 1998: Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market, a concept believed to be a world first, opens on Lorne Street on the site of the old Elim Church. The naysayers said it wouldn’t last, but after just two days the store was so busy that Graeme had to pull the advertising.

    Porirua Fresh

    Porirua Fresh

    1999: The Fresh category is introduced at Moore Wilson’s Porirua.

    An Evening with Jamie

    An Evening with Jamie

    May 2000: Jamie Oliver visits Moore Wilson’s Wellington, with a large crowd filling the entire lower carpark. Jamie, then just 25 years old, entertained with his signature Essex charm, demonstrating recipes at the event MC’d by Wellington food personality Ruth Pretty.

    Masterton Fresh

    Masterton Fresh

    2002: Fresh category introduced at Moore Wilson’s Masterton.

    Restaurant Association Award

    Restaurant Association Award

    2002: Moore Wilson’s Fresh awarded Innovator Award by Restaurant Association of New Zealand.

    Cuisine Award

    Cuisine Award

    2004: Moore Wilson’s Fresh named Supreme Winner of the Cuisine and Matua Valley Wines Awards of Innovation and Excellence.

    Porirua Farmers Market

    Porirua Farmers Market

    July 2006: A weekly market called Moore Wilson’s Farmer’s Fresh begins, running on Saturday mornings in the bulk warehouse across the carpark from the main Porirua store. The market closed in 2010.

    New Fresh Market

    New Fresh Market

    December 2008: After outgrowing the original space, a new larger Fresh Market is opened on the College Street side of Moore Wilson’s Wellington site. Liquor moves from inside Grocery to the standalone building that housed the old Fresh Market.

    Dibble in the Piazza

    Dibble in the Piazza

    April 2009: A sculpture by renowned Manawatu artist Paul Dibble is unveiled in the Tory Street Piazza to tell the story of the artesian bore that runs under the site.

    Fresh Workshops

    Fresh Workshops

    March 2011: Fresh Workshops begin. Workshops ran on Thursday mornings from 2011 to 2015 in a room off Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Fresh and were hosted by guest chefs, bakers, food personalities, and cookbook authors.

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    Wellingtonians of the Year

    2012: Graeme & Julie Moore awarded Wellingtonians of the Year in the Business category of The Wellys.

    The Chook Wagon

    The Chook Wagon

    August 2012: The Chook Wagon opens in the carpark above Moore Wilson’s Wellington Fresh Market, recreating the traditional French ‘Poulet Rotisserie’ experience served from a replica of the iconic 1947 Citroen H-van. The Citroen was designed and built by Miramar’s Human Dynamo Workshop.

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    O’Sushi Tory Street

    December 2013: O’Sushi opens in a custom built kiosk in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory St.

    Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct

    March 2014: Moore Wilson’s launch first e-commerce website “Moore Wilson’s Wine Direct”. The website featured a small hand-picked range of wines available for delivery nationwide.

    Berry Culture

    Berry Culture

    September 2014: The Berry Culture frozen yoghurt truck parked up in the Piazza of Moore Wilson’s Tory Street, serving natural yoghurt with live cultures and a range of premium topping. The Citroen hit the road in March 2016, returning to Christchurch.

    Moore Wilson’s Online

    October 2015: A new website “Moore Wilson’s Online” is launched with an increased range of wine, beers, and spirits as well as products from the Kitchen and Homeware department available to purchase online. Content including recipes, events, supplier profiles and product trends is also added.

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    Pop-Up Food Pods

    April 2016: Pop-Up Food Pods are introduced in the Tory Street Piazza with the aim of giving our trade customers and suppliers the chance to showcase their cafes, restaurants, food trucks, and products.

    Building Strengthening

    Building Strengthening

    June 2016: 18 months of building strengthening work by L.T. McGuinness at Moore Wilson’s Tory Street Store are completed. The new buckling-restrained braces had their first test (and passed with flying colours) when the Kaikoura earthquake struck in November.

    Business Hall of Fame

    Business Hall of Fame

    July 2016: Moore Wilson’s inducted into the Wellington Region Business Hall of Fame.

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    Porirua Wine, Beer & Spirits

    July 2017: With the help of Human Dynamo, Porirua’s standalone Wine, Beer & Spirits store underwent a nautical makeover, paying homage to the regions sea-side location.

    Felix Awards

    Felix Awards

    October 2017: Moore Wilson’s accept the award for Outstanding Supplier at the 2017 Felix Awards.

    O’Sushi Porirua

    O’Sushi Porirua

    November 2017: O’Sushi opens at Moore Wilson’s Porirua. The exterior features a stunning painting of Mana Island by Human Dynamo director Sue Dorrington, continuing the nautical theme from the Wine, Beer & Spirits store across the carpark.

    Celebrating 100 Years

    Celebrating 100 Years

    1st June 2018: Moore Wilson’s celebrates 100 years in business.

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market 20 Years

    December 2018 : Moore Wilson’s Fresh Market celebrating 20 years.

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    The Retail Hotlist Awards

    September 2019: Moore Wilson’s wins Hottest Retail Business in Operation over 20 Years at the Gem Retail Hotlist 2019 Awards.

  • Queen Sally's Cacao & Berry Celebration Cake

    Recipe from the 2018 Moore Wilson's Calendar. Thank you to Queen Sally's Diamond Deli for creating this beautiful celebration cake for our Centenary month!

  • The Best Brussels Sprouts

    A member of the Brassica family, Brussels Sprouts are, of course, named after the city of Brussels where they are thought to have originated. There are two main growing areas in New Zealand. The first is Ohakune in the central North Island. It tends to produce smaller sprouts with compact heads These become available early in the season (autumn). The second major growing area is Oamaru in North Otago where they  produce slightly larger sprouts  using a different sprout variety. Oamaru sprouts arrive later in the season and have a sweeter flavour.

    Brussels Sprouts are very good for you because they are a rich source of phytochemicals including glucosinolates, carotenoids and phenolic compounds. They are an excellent source of vitamin C, folate and also a good source of B group vitamins. Brussels Sprouts also contain sulforaphane, a chemical believed to have anti-cancer properties. (Note that boiling reduces the amount of anticancer compounds but steaming and sautéing do not result in significant loss.)

    Traditionally Brussels Sprouts are usually boiled or steamed but whatever cooking method you use, they do need to carefully cooked. Overcooking has been responsible for sometimes giving  sprouts a bad reputation because overcooking results in the release of high amounts of sulfur that badly affects the smell and taste. So, however you cook your sprouts, avoid overcooking at all costs.

    With the addition of butter and bacon, this simple recipe from Annabel Langbein is sure to convert even those who would normally turn up their nose at Brussels sprouts!

  • New Zealand Honey

    Honey has a long history of human consumption. Apparently humans began hunting for honey at least 8000 years ago as evidenced by some ancient cave paintings found in Spain. Honey is also found in the records of ancient Egypt and it is acknowledged that the art of beekeeping has existed in China since time immemorial.

    Honey, of course, is made by bees using nectar from flowers. Honey gets its sweetness from a combination of fructose and glucose. These two sugars don’t need to be broken down by our digestive system so honey is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, giving a quick energy boost to the body.

    The flavour of the honey depends on the plants and flowers where the bees have collected their nectar and this is why New Zealand honey is quite special. New Zealand’s long isolation from the rest of the world and its island biogeography means that the flora and fauna here is extraordinarily unique. About 80% of this flora only occurs in New Zealand and this uniqueness has a remarkable influence on our locally produced honey. One of the most common examples of this unique flora is Manuka, a local evergreen tree. The intensely scented Manuka flowers bloom in summer and bees absolutely love them.

    Today there is even a registered trademark called UMF which means Unique Manuka Factors. It has become a world renowned trademark because Manuka honey is internationally acknowledged as having anti-bacterial properties that remarkably support the body's health and well-being. In particular 15+ Manuka Honey is being increasingly used in the treatment of burns.

    Along with being renowned for its health properties, Manuka honey is a wonderful eating experience. The dark cream to dark brown honey has a distinctive taste profile; slightly bitter, herbaceous, with intense woody and slightly nutty flavour notes.

    In fact New Zealand’s unique flora results in a wide range of different honey flavours and our local honey producers are making the most of this uniqueness. Mono-floral (single flower) honeys are  increasingly popular and honeys available include Beechwood, Pohutakawa, Kamahi, Rata, Tawari, Rewarewa and also honey made from imported field flora such as clover and thyme and various wild flowers (such as bugloss). The diversity of the New Zealand honey range is quite outstanding.

    Honey colour ranges from almost colourless to dark amber brown.  In general, honeys from forest floral sources are darker in colour and richer in flavour while honeys from field floral sources are lighter in colour with a delicate fine flavour. And honey, of course, can be presented in a variety of forms including comb, liquid and creamed.

    NZ Honey brands available from Moore Wilson's Fresh include Arataki (Hawkes Bay), J Bush and Sons (Blenheim), Earthbound (Auckland), J Friend & Co. (Christchurch), Local Flavour (Wellington), and Silverstream (Upper Hutt).

    There are many wide and varied uses for honey including:

    FOOD

    • The most common use of honey is to simply serve it on bread or toast. Increasingly popular is a little honey mixed with your breakfast muesli
    • It is also widely used as sweetener in baking, as an ingredient in glazes, or as a flavourful addition in Asian dishes
    • Use to sweeten your homemade nut milks
    • For something different, try infusing your honey with different flavour combinations like ginger and lime or apple cider and dried figs

    HEALTH

    • Honey is a natural antiseptic so will help to heal wounds, cuts, scraps and burns
    • Combine with the juice of one lemon to sooth sore throats and coughs
    • Combine equal parts honey, vinegar and water and drink to remove parasites

    BEAUTY

    • Use as a moisturizer, simply rub on to dry or patchy skin and let it sit for around 30 minutes before washing off
    • Add a teaspoon to your normal shampoo to help smooth damaged locks
    • Relax and soak your skin in a soothing honey bath – dissolve 2 tablespoons of honey in 1 cup hot water and add to your bath along with a couple of drops of lavender oil
    • Combine 2 teaspoons of milk with 2 tablespoons of honey for a natural face mask. Cover your face and let it sit for 10 minutes before washing off
  • Greek Wines

    The 1980s was not the best time for wine drinkers – for most of us there was not a huge choice, and imported wines especially were often the mass produced and lower-end of the spectrum.

    Some wine regions have struggled to shake off the reputations made for them, but in these more enlightened times, we know there is more to German wines than Piesporter and Black Tower, so much more to Sherry than flagons of Pale Cream, and so so much more to Greek wine than the Retsina you drank from a tap in the wall on your holiday in Corfu!

    Greece is one of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world, with evidence of winemaking dating back 6,500 years, and in Roman times wines from Greece were renowned for their quality.

    Despite the surge in popularity of wine in recent years, modern Greek wines are only just coming to the attention of the world’s wine drinkers, and those who are adventurous enough to give them a try will be rewarded with interesting wines made using varieties you’ve never heard of.

    We’ll be the first to admit we struggle to pronounce some of these names (especially after a glass or two) but don’t let that put you off – we’ve added pronunciation guides for each wine…

    Boutari Moschofilero  (mo-sko-feel-er-oh)

    A strong varietal aroma of flowers and citrus fruit on the nose and palate, with white rose and orange blossom prevailing. A fresh wine, full and balanced, with a long finish. In an effort to literally save the Moschofilero variety from extinction and in recognition of the enormous potential of this strongly aromatic variety, Boutari worked hard to produce their now famous Moschofilero.

    Boutari Agiorgitiko        (ah-jor-yee-tee-koh)

    Deep red, attractive colour and a rich aromatic bouquet, with a balance of red fruit aromas, like plum and the sweet notes of ageing, vanilla and cocoa. Rich, well-structured, balanced, with a velvety aftertaste. Similar in style to Merlot, but with slightly more spice.

    Cambas Mavrodaphnie Of Patras            (mav-roh-daf-nee)

    A remarkably affordable example of this famous sweet red wine from the hilly northwestern region of Achaia. Aromas of raisins, dark chocolate and cinnamon, with a rich textured palate and a long finish. Serve slightly chilled as an aperitif, or at the end of the meal with a decadent dessert.

    Retsina Cambas Karavaki  (ret-see-nah) - ideally in an Essex accent, for that authentic Brits-abroad Greek island holiday vibe…

    Ok ok, so we’ve done a lot of taking-the-mickey out of Retsina – but it is a specialty of Greece, a white wine infused with the sap of the Allepo pine tree. Aromas of linseed oil and lime peel that lead into flavors of apples and roses, with a subtle piney, saline finish. And as with all things, there are better examples. This Karavaki Retsina by Cambas is one of the lighter examples, with bright fruit aromas underpinned with the resinous pine backbone. Try with richer seafood such as octopus or shellfish.

    Eat The Food, Drink The Wine... As with many older wine regions, the best way to appreciate the wines of Greece is with the local cuisine. It makes sense really, as the style of the dishes and the style of the wine have evolved alongside each other over many centuries. Many Greek wines have an element of spice and rich aromatics, which perfectly balance the intensity of Greek foods. So grab some Kalamata olives, some quality feta and dig in!

  • Shed 5 Tuna Sashimi with Apple and Lychee Salad, Nam Jim, and Coconut Sauce

    Shed 5 occupies one of the oldest wharf stores in Lambton Harbour. A water’s edge position and in-house fishmonger contribute to its standing as Wellington’s premier seafood restaurant.

    A Wellington institution, Shed 5 is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.

    This recipe was provided by Head Chef, Geoff Ngan. Inspired by his wife, fresh tuna is the hero of this dish with flavours of classic Thai green curry providing a unique twist.

    Serves 2 as an entree.

  • The Botanist's Buckwheat Pancakes with Berry Compote & Banana

    Vegan and gluten free. Recipes makes 6 medium sized pancakes.

  • Sweet Bakery's Lemon & Raspberry Slice

    Recipe from Cuba Street - A Cookbook.

  • Ti Kouka's Beetroot & Kumara Gnocchi with Blue Cheese Cream

    Light and fluffy gnocchi parcels with a decadent blue cheese sauce from the talented culinary team at Ti Kouka Cafe. Serves 4.

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